Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289130
Title:
Ecology of coyotes in Tucson, Arizona
Author:
Grinder, Martha Irene, 1967-1999
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Coyotes (Canis latrans) are common in many urban areas in North America, but little is known about how they adapt to urbanization. I studied the way they use the urban landscape by determining the patch types chosen for foraging, travelling, and resting. Home ranges encompassed a smaller proportion of natural areas and a greater proportion of parks and residential areas than were available in Tucson. Rates of nocturnal movement by coyotes peaked at midnight and at dawn. Natural areas, parks, and residential areas were used most by coyotes throughout the night, but rates of movement did not differ among these patch types. I created a GIS (geographic information system) model to predict the presence or absence of coyotes in all patch types throughout Tucson. The model indicates that most areas in Tucson are likely to be used by coyotes; it may be refined by adding new variables and by examining these variables at a finer spatial scale. Studies have not documented the health of coyotes in urban areas, where they may be reservoirs of disease for domestic canids. I determined the prevalence of pathogens, estimated survival rates, and identified sources of mortality. The prevalence of canine distemper virus was 27%, the prevalence of infectious canine hepatitis was 50%, the prevalence of canine parvovirus was 100%, and the prevalence of leptospirosis was 27%. The annual survival rate of coyotes was 0.72. Most necropsied coyotes were killed by humans. Coyotes in urban areas come into conflict with humans. Few humans have been attacked by coyotes, but small pets are susceptible to attack. The primary means of deterring coyotes from areas where their presence is unwanted is by eliminating all sources of food and water. The urban-dwelling public must become better educated about coyotes to minimize human-coyote conflicts.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Krausman, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEcology of coyotes in Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorGrinder, Martha Irene, 1967-1999en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrinder, Martha Irene, 1967-1999en_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCoyotes (Canis latrans) are common in many urban areas in North America, but little is known about how they adapt to urbanization. I studied the way they use the urban landscape by determining the patch types chosen for foraging, travelling, and resting. Home ranges encompassed a smaller proportion of natural areas and a greater proportion of parks and residential areas than were available in Tucson. Rates of nocturnal movement by coyotes peaked at midnight and at dawn. Natural areas, parks, and residential areas were used most by coyotes throughout the night, but rates of movement did not differ among these patch types. I created a GIS (geographic information system) model to predict the presence or absence of coyotes in all patch types throughout Tucson. The model indicates that most areas in Tucson are likely to be used by coyotes; it may be refined by adding new variables and by examining these variables at a finer spatial scale. Studies have not documented the health of coyotes in urban areas, where they may be reservoirs of disease for domestic canids. I determined the prevalence of pathogens, estimated survival rates, and identified sources of mortality. The prevalence of canine distemper virus was 27%, the prevalence of infectious canine hepatitis was 50%, the prevalence of canine parvovirus was 100%, and the prevalence of leptospirosis was 27%. The annual survival rate of coyotes was 0.72. Most necropsied coyotes were killed by humans. Coyotes in urban areas come into conflict with humans. Few humans have been attacked by coyotes, but small pets are susceptible to attack. The primary means of deterring coyotes from areas where their presence is unwanted is by eliminating all sources of food and water. The urban-dwelling public must become better educated about coyotes to minimize human-coyote conflicts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9971860en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40274767en_US
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