The effects of alcohol and drug abuse on the sternal end of the fourth rib

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289126
Title:
The effects of alcohol and drug abuse on the sternal end of the fourth rib
Author:
Taylor, Katherine Markham
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Estimation of skeletal age at death is based on the premise that osseous tissue undergoes predictable and patterned changes through the life of the individual that can be quantified and accurately correlated with skeletal age. The utility of any method of estimating skeletal age at death is dependent on two basic principles. First, the descriptive parameters of the method must account for the range of phenotypic variation observed at the skeletal site. Second, the method must be accurate when applied to an unknown individual, regardless of the individual's unique life history. This study examines the reliability and accuracy of the sternal end of the fourth rib method for the determination of skeletal age at death and explores whether chronic substance abuse alters the pattern of change at the sternal end of the fourth rib. Additional variables considered include gender, race and the presence of thoracic disease. One hundred and fifty five sets of ribs, obtained during forensic autopsy, are examined and age at death determined in two separate trials. All antemortem data, with the exception of gender, are collected following completion of rib examination in order to prevent biasing the observer. Reliability (intra-observer error) and accuracy are computed utilizing the kappa statistic. The results suggest that the sternal end of the fourth rib is a reliable but not an accurate method of determining skeletal age at death. The variables of sex, race, and thoracic disease all influence the accuracy of the method. Chronic substance abuse appears to influence both the reliability and the accuracy of the method.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Physical.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zegura, Stephen L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effects of alcohol and drug abuse on the sternal end of the fourth riben_US
dc.creatorTaylor, Katherine Markhamen_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Katherine Markhamen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEstimation of skeletal age at death is based on the premise that osseous tissue undergoes predictable and patterned changes through the life of the individual that can be quantified and accurately correlated with skeletal age. The utility of any method of estimating skeletal age at death is dependent on two basic principles. First, the descriptive parameters of the method must account for the range of phenotypic variation observed at the skeletal site. Second, the method must be accurate when applied to an unknown individual, regardless of the individual's unique life history. This study examines the reliability and accuracy of the sternal end of the fourth rib method for the determination of skeletal age at death and explores whether chronic substance abuse alters the pattern of change at the sternal end of the fourth rib. Additional variables considered include gender, race and the presence of thoracic disease. One hundred and fifty five sets of ribs, obtained during forensic autopsy, are examined and age at death determined in two separate trials. All antemortem data, with the exception of gender, are collected following completion of rib examination in order to prevent biasing the observer. Reliability (intra-observer error) and accuracy are computed utilizing the kappa statistic. The results suggest that the sternal end of the fourth rib is a reliable but not an accurate method of determining skeletal age at death. The variables of sex, race, and thoracic disease all influence the accuracy of the method. Chronic substance abuse appears to influence both the reliability and the accuracy of the method.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Physical.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZegura, Stephen L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9965932en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40485663en_US
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