The antecedents of trust in a manager: The subordinate tells the story of time

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289113
Title:
The antecedents of trust in a manager: The subordinate tells the story of time
Author:
Cherry, Bennett Wayne
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Trust is considered essential for effective relationships both in the workplace and outside the workplace. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of empirical support for how interpersonal trust is actually developed between a manager and subordinate. This research examines this development by empirically testing antecedents of trust including time as an important moderator. In earlier proposed models of trust, time has either been left out entirely or innocently subsumed in other factors. This research also investigates the impact of different sources of information that subordinates use in determining the trustworthiness of their manager. Multiple research methods are used to address the research questions. First, in-depth interviews with employees were conducted to determine whether the proposed trust model includes all of the important factors that influence employees' trust in their supervisors. Following this, a scenario study was developed to test a portion of the model that deals with the sources of information that subordinates use in assessing a manager's trustworthiness. Finally, two samples of employees responded to a comprehensive questionnaire that uncovered the factors hypothesized to influence trust in their manager. The results from these multiple studies produce a surprisingly simple result: the trust that an employee has in his/her manager is developed through word-of-mouth or reputational information and frequent interaction with the manager. Although a moderator model was proposed and tested, the results, nevertheless, suggest that a more parsimonious model is possible.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Business Administration, Management.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Industrial Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gilliland, Stephen W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe antecedents of trust in a manager: The subordinate tells the story of timeen_US
dc.creatorCherry, Bennett Wayneen_US
dc.contributor.authorCherry, Bennett Wayneen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTrust is considered essential for effective relationships both in the workplace and outside the workplace. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of empirical support for how interpersonal trust is actually developed between a manager and subordinate. This research examines this development by empirically testing antecedents of trust including time as an important moderator. In earlier proposed models of trust, time has either been left out entirely or innocently subsumed in other factors. This research also investigates the impact of different sources of information that subordinates use in determining the trustworthiness of their manager. Multiple research methods are used to address the research questions. First, in-depth interviews with employees were conducted to determine whether the proposed trust model includes all of the important factors that influence employees' trust in their supervisors. Following this, a scenario study was developed to test a portion of the model that deals with the sources of information that subordinates use in assessing a manager's trustworthiness. Finally, two samples of employees responded to a comprehensive questionnaire that uncovered the factors hypothesized to influence trust in their manager. The results from these multiple studies produce a surprisingly simple result: the trust that an employee has in his/her manager is developed through word-of-mouth or reputational information and frequent interaction with the manager. Although a moderator model was proposed and tested, the results, nevertheless, suggest that a more parsimonious model is possible.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGilliland, Stephen W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9965903en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4048211xen_US
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