The effects of Spanish contact on Hopi faunal utilization in the American Southwest

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289112
Title:
The effects of Spanish contact on Hopi faunal utilization in the American Southwest
Author:
Chapin-Pyritz, Regina Louise
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Few archaeological sites in the Southwest have been documented, much less excavated, which contain occupations that span the pre- and post-Spanish contact time periods in the same way as Awatovi, an abandoned Hopi village in Northeastern Arizona. Awatovi provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of European contact on a traditional society. Using ethnohistorical, ethnographical, and archaeological data, primarily the zooarchaeological collections, a means of ascertaining what effects the introduction of Old World domestic animals had on Hopi subsistence strategies and bone resource utilization over time is explored. An intrasite comparison is conducted between the three major Awatovi sections: the Western Mound, the Hopi Village, and the Spanish Mission so that these effects may be studied. The prehistoric and historic Awatovi archaeofaunal assemblages are compared to the Hopi sites of Homol'ovi and Walpi, respectively, in order to identify possible sampling problems and animal usage patterns.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Adams, E. Charles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effects of Spanish contact on Hopi faunal utilization in the American Southwesten_US
dc.creatorChapin-Pyritz, Regina Louiseen_US
dc.contributor.authorChapin-Pyritz, Regina Louiseen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFew archaeological sites in the Southwest have been documented, much less excavated, which contain occupations that span the pre- and post-Spanish contact time periods in the same way as Awatovi, an abandoned Hopi village in Northeastern Arizona. Awatovi provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of European contact on a traditional society. Using ethnohistorical, ethnographical, and archaeological data, primarily the zooarchaeological collections, a means of ascertaining what effects the introduction of Old World domestic animals had on Hopi subsistence strategies and bone resource utilization over time is explored. An intrasite comparison is conducted between the three major Awatovi sections: the Western Mound, the Hopi Village, and the Spanish Mission so that these effects may be studied. The prehistoric and historic Awatovi archaeofaunal assemblages are compared to the Hopi sites of Homol'ovi and Walpi, respectively, in order to identify possible sampling problems and animal usage patterns.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAdams, E. Charlesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9965902en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40482091en_US
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