The relation of minimum data set ratings and performance on measures of linguistic communication and hearing

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289108
Title:
The relation of minimum data set ratings and performance on measures of linguistic communication and hearing
Author:
Hopper, Tammy Lynn Suzanne
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation between ratings on items in the Communication/Hearing Patterns section of the Minimum Data Set for Nursing Home Resident Assessment (MDS; Morris et al., 1990) and performance on external criterion measures of linguistic communication and hearing. Linguistic communication was evaluated with the Story Retelling Subtest of the Arizona Battery for Communication Disorders of Dementia (ABCD; Bayles & Tomoeda, 1993) and the Functional Linguistic Communication Inventory (FLCI; Bayles & Tomoeda, 1994). Auditory evaluation included an otoscopic check, hearing aid check (when appropriate), pure-tone hearing screening, and monitored, live-voice speech recognition testing. Fifty-seven individuals participated in the study. All lived in long-term care facilities in southeastern Arizona and had a diagnosis of dementia. Residents with MDS classifications of 0 (normal) scored significantly higher on the FLCI and the Story Retelling Subtest than did those residents classified as 1 (impaired). However, all of the participants demonstrated some impairment in linguistic communication as indicated by scores on the FLCI and the Story Retelling Subtest. Individuals categorized as having adequate hearing ability on the MDS scored significantly higher on speech recognition testing than did those categorized as impaired. However, no relation was found between MDS classification of hearing function and pure-tone hearing screening results. Surprisingly, none of the individuals with MDS-identified impairments had been referred to a communication specialist for further evaluation. The implications of the results for service delivery in nursing homes are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Gerontology.; Health Sciences, Speech Pathology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bayles, Kathryn A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe relation of minimum data set ratings and performance on measures of linguistic communication and hearingen_US
dc.creatorHopper, Tammy Lynn Suzanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorHopper, Tammy Lynn Suzanneen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the relation between ratings on items in the Communication/Hearing Patterns section of the Minimum Data Set for Nursing Home Resident Assessment (MDS; Morris et al., 1990) and performance on external criterion measures of linguistic communication and hearing. Linguistic communication was evaluated with the Story Retelling Subtest of the Arizona Battery for Communication Disorders of Dementia (ABCD; Bayles & Tomoeda, 1993) and the Functional Linguistic Communication Inventory (FLCI; Bayles & Tomoeda, 1994). Auditory evaluation included an otoscopic check, hearing aid check (when appropriate), pure-tone hearing screening, and monitored, live-voice speech recognition testing. Fifty-seven individuals participated in the study. All lived in long-term care facilities in southeastern Arizona and had a diagnosis of dementia. Residents with MDS classifications of 0 (normal) scored significantly higher on the FLCI and the Story Retelling Subtest than did those residents classified as 1 (impaired). However, all of the participants demonstrated some impairment in linguistic communication as indicated by scores on the FLCI and the Story Retelling Subtest. Individuals categorized as having adequate hearing ability on the MDS scored significantly higher on speech recognition testing than did those categorized as impaired. However, no relation was found between MDS classification of hearing function and pure-tone hearing screening results. Surprisingly, none of the individuals with MDS-identified impairments had been referred to a communication specialist for further evaluation. The implications of the results for service delivery in nursing homes are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGerontology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Speech Pathology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBayles, Kathryn A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9965894en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40480835en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.