Her work, his play? The faculty salary structure at a Research I university

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289084
Title:
Her work, his play? The faculty salary structure at a Research I university
Author:
Geisler, Iris Arabella Cordula
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation contributes to three major issues in Labor Economics and Econometrics literature. The first contribution is providing new insights into panel-data techniques, the second is new findings on the relationship of women's and men's productivity and pay, and the third is a picture of the remuneration process for professors involved in research and teaching at a Research I University which is based on the detailed data set created for this study. Developing econometric panel data methodology, time-static information is added to a standard fixed effects model. In a setting where no suitable time-varying instruments for the time-static information can be found, it is necessary to calculate the estimates for those in a "second stage" fixed effects estimate. It will be shown that these second stage estimates are exactly equal to the pooled OLS estimates for the same model specification, but that the standard errors are different, and the second stage estimates are biased and inconsistent. Later, new tests for various components of the individual effects are conducted as well as tests to choose the best panel estimation method. Empirically, this work contributes to research on gender discrimination in pay, and its results affect more than the academic environment. So far, most studies were not able to include direct measures of productivity, and have assumed that the estimated gender gap represents an upper bound or overestimation of the real discrimination in pay. The results of this study show that this assumption is not necessarily correct. Looking specifically at the pay structure for university professors involved in teaching and research in a Research I University, several trends have been established. First, structural pay differences between colleges became very apparent, making a strong point against the usage of university-wide regression analysis. For the colleges of Business and Education, seniority lost much of its explanatory power in predicting salaries when publications were added to the analysis. Teaching awards were not rewarded at all in either college, but professors who did not teach were financially penalized.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Finance.; Women's Studies.; Economics, Labor.; Education, Administration.; Sociology, Industrial and Labor Relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Economics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Oaxaca, Ronald L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHer work, his play? The faculty salary structure at a Research I universityen_US
dc.creatorGeisler, Iris Arabella Cordulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeisler, Iris Arabella Cordulaen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation contributes to three major issues in Labor Economics and Econometrics literature. The first contribution is providing new insights into panel-data techniques, the second is new findings on the relationship of women's and men's productivity and pay, and the third is a picture of the remuneration process for professors involved in research and teaching at a Research I University which is based on the detailed data set created for this study. Developing econometric panel data methodology, time-static information is added to a standard fixed effects model. In a setting where no suitable time-varying instruments for the time-static information can be found, it is necessary to calculate the estimates for those in a "second stage" fixed effects estimate. It will be shown that these second stage estimates are exactly equal to the pooled OLS estimates for the same model specification, but that the standard errors are different, and the second stage estimates are biased and inconsistent. Later, new tests for various components of the individual effects are conducted as well as tests to choose the best panel estimation method. Empirically, this work contributes to research on gender discrimination in pay, and its results affect more than the academic environment. So far, most studies were not able to include direct measures of productivity, and have assumed that the estimated gender gap represents an upper bound or overestimation of the real discrimination in pay. The results of this study show that this assumption is not necessarily correct. Looking specifically at the pay structure for university professors involved in teaching and research in a Research I University, several trends have been established. First, structural pay differences between colleges became very apparent, making a strong point against the usage of university-wide regression analysis. For the colleges of Business and Education, seniority lost much of its explanatory power in predicting salaries when publications were added to the analysis. Teaching awards were not rewarded at all in either college, but professors who did not teach were financially penalized.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Finance.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Labor.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Industrial and Labor Relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOaxaca, Ronald L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9960282en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40273714en_US
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