Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289083
Title:
Particle growth in plasmas
Author:
Schabel, Michael Joseph, 1973-
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Plasmas are used extensively in the manufacturing of microelectronic devices. In typical fabrication facilities, plasmas may be used for etching, deposition, cleaning of a substrate, and chamber cleaning. One of the major challenges to the effective use of plasmas for microelectronics processing is the formation of particles and films from reaction byproducts, which can contaminate both the substrate and the chamber. However, in other communities, the growth of particles and films in plasmas provides opportunities for the production of novel materials, for studies of astrophysical phenomena, and for macroscopic simulations of condensed matter physics. Extensive studies of particles and films in plasmas have resulted in an understanding of particle dynamics including charging, trapping, transport, and deposition. However, comparatively little is understood about the nucleation and growth behavior of particles and films. In this contribution, particle and film formation mechanisms in low-pressure fluorocarbon plasmas are discussed. It is shown that gas phase molecular growth reactions are responsible for the formation of chemical precursor to particle and film nucleation. A fluorocarbon chemical reaction library has been developed, and when used in conjunction with a plasma chemical kinetics model, gives excellent agreement with experimental observations of molecular growth reactions and particle and film formation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Chemical.; Physics, Fluid and Plasma.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemical and Environmental Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Peterson, Thomas W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleParticle growth in plasmasen_US
dc.creatorSchabel, Michael Joseph, 1973-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSchabel, Michael Joseph, 1973-en_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPlasmas are used extensively in the manufacturing of microelectronic devices. In typical fabrication facilities, plasmas may be used for etching, deposition, cleaning of a substrate, and chamber cleaning. One of the major challenges to the effective use of plasmas for microelectronics processing is the formation of particles and films from reaction byproducts, which can contaminate both the substrate and the chamber. However, in other communities, the growth of particles and films in plasmas provides opportunities for the production of novel materials, for studies of astrophysical phenomena, and for macroscopic simulations of condensed matter physics. Extensive studies of particles and films in plasmas have resulted in an understanding of particle dynamics including charging, trapping, transport, and deposition. However, comparatively little is understood about the nucleation and growth behavior of particles and films. In this contribution, particle and film formation mechanisms in low-pressure fluorocarbon plasmas are discussed. It is shown that gas phase molecular growth reactions are responsible for the formation of chemical precursor to particle and film nucleation. A fluorocarbon chemical reaction library has been developed, and when used in conjunction with a plasma chemical kinetics model, gives excellent agreement with experimental observations of molecular growth reactions and particle and film formation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Chemical.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Fluid and Plasma.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical and Environmental Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPeterson, Thomas W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9960281en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40273684en_US
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