An examination of predictive and content validity of the Portraits Questionnaire for use with Native American and non-Native American consumers of rehabilitation services

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289073
Title:
An examination of predictive and content validity of the Portraits Questionnaire for use with Native American and non-Native American consumers of rehabilitation services
Author:
Dennis, David James
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive and content validity of the Portraits Questionnaire (PQ), a universal values survey, for use with consumers of state-federal rehabilitation services. Convenience samples of Native American and Non-Native American consumers receiving services from Arizona Rehabilitation Services Administration were selected to represent the range of value priorities found in the diverse national population of rehabilitation consumers. A test for predictive validity was established by proposing a null hypothesis that the responses to the PQ by the study groups would not predict group membership. An examination of content validity was based on the logical relationship between the responses to the PQ by the two study groups and the values attributed to the two study groups in the literature. Two null hypotheses were established to test content validity. The first null hypothesis predicted that the Native American group would not assign a higher priority to PQ value types, Benevolence, Tradition, Conformity, and Security, than the Non-Native American group would. The second null hypothesis predicted that the Non-Native American group would not assign a higher priority to value types, Self-Direction, Stimulation, Hedonism, Achievement, Power, and Universalism, than the Native American group would. Copies of the PQ were mailed to 259 Native American and 263 Non-Native American consumers. Usable responses were received from 96 members of the Native American group and 97 members of the Non-Native American group. Discriminant Analysis of the data produced a significant discriminant function (Wilks' Lambda = .856, p = .001) that predicted correct group membership for 65.8% of the cases. The null hypothesis was rejected and predictive validity of the Portraits Questionnaire for the study groups accepted. Univariate analysis of the data revealed two significant (p ≤ .05) discriminant variables, Tradition and Stimulation. The standardized canonical discriminant function coefficients indicated that both variables were predictors of Native American membership. Therefore, both null hypotheses for content validity were retained. Tradition was the only value type that predicted group membership as expected. Interpretations of the results are offered and implications presented. The need for further research is discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy.; Education, Guidance and Counseling.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kampfe, Charlene M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn examination of predictive and content validity of the Portraits Questionnaire for use with Native American and non-Native American consumers of rehabilitation servicesen_US
dc.creatorDennis, David Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorDennis, David Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the predictive and content validity of the Portraits Questionnaire (PQ), a universal values survey, for use with consumers of state-federal rehabilitation services. Convenience samples of Native American and Non-Native American consumers receiving services from Arizona Rehabilitation Services Administration were selected to represent the range of value priorities found in the diverse national population of rehabilitation consumers. A test for predictive validity was established by proposing a null hypothesis that the responses to the PQ by the study groups would not predict group membership. An examination of content validity was based on the logical relationship between the responses to the PQ by the two study groups and the values attributed to the two study groups in the literature. Two null hypotheses were established to test content validity. The first null hypothesis predicted that the Native American group would not assign a higher priority to PQ value types, Benevolence, Tradition, Conformity, and Security, than the Non-Native American group would. The second null hypothesis predicted that the Non-Native American group would not assign a higher priority to value types, Self-Direction, Stimulation, Hedonism, Achievement, Power, and Universalism, than the Native American group would. Copies of the PQ were mailed to 259 Native American and 263 Non-Native American consumers. Usable responses were received from 96 members of the Native American group and 97 members of the Non-Native American group. Discriminant Analysis of the data produced a significant discriminant function (Wilks' Lambda = .856, p = .001) that predicted correct group membership for 65.8% of the cases. The null hypothesis was rejected and predictive validity of the Portraits Questionnaire for the study groups accepted. Univariate analysis of the data revealed two significant (p ≤ .05) discriminant variables, Tradition and Stimulation. The standardized canonical discriminant function coefficients indicated that both variables were predictors of Native American membership. Therefore, both null hypotheses for content validity were retained. Tradition was the only value type that predicted group membership as expected. Interpretations of the results are offered and implications presented. The need for further research is discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Rehabilitation and Therapy.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Guidance and Counseling.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKampfe, Charlene M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9960250en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40274056en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.