Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289047
Title:
The use of fear appeals in genetic testing
Author:
Grandpre, Joseph Roy
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The traditional model of medicine involves recognizing symptoms, undergoing diagnostic tests to find the cause of the symptoms, and provide treatment to relieve or cure the underlying disease. However, with the advent of genetic testing and the ability to diagnose asymptomatic individuals, the traditional model of diagnostic testing and treatment no longer applies. By employing the Extended Parallel Processing Model, EPPM, and utilizing messages similar to fear appeals, this study examined participants' perceptions of testing and treatment efficacy, behavioral intentions to undergo testing, and attitudes towards traditional and genetically-based diagnostic testing. Results indicated that the type of diagnostic test and the temporal proximity of the treatment with respect to the diagnostic test is important in determining the perceived efficacy of testing, treatment, and intent to undergo testing. Practical as well as theoretical implications are discussed as well as directions for future research.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Speech Communication.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Buller, David B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe use of fear appeals in genetic testingen_US
dc.creatorGrandpre, Joseph Royen_US
dc.contributor.authorGrandpre, Joseph Royen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe traditional model of medicine involves recognizing symptoms, undergoing diagnostic tests to find the cause of the symptoms, and provide treatment to relieve or cure the underlying disease. However, with the advent of genetic testing and the ability to diagnose asymptomatic individuals, the traditional model of diagnostic testing and treatment no longer applies. By employing the Extended Parallel Processing Model, EPPM, and utilizing messages similar to fear appeals, this study examined participants' perceptions of testing and treatment efficacy, behavioral intentions to undergo testing, and attitudes towards traditional and genetically-based diagnostic testing. Results indicated that the type of diagnostic test and the temporal proximity of the treatment with respect to the diagnostic test is important in determining the perceived efficacy of testing, treatment, and intent to undergo testing. Practical as well as theoretical implications are discussed as well as directions for future research.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBuller, David B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9957939en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40114612en_US
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