Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289046
Title:
Superresolution applied to optical data storage systems
Author:
Walker, Edwin Parker
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation investigates superresolution applications in optical data storage systems. The performance of standard and superresolving magneto-optic data storage system are quantified by scalar diffraction modeling and experiments. Classical resolution measures are reviewed. Background on superresolution definitions and their conceptual development in scanning optical microscopes, optical data storage, and image processing is presented. Figures of merit for quantifying the performance of the systems are reviewed, such as system transfer function, two-point response, focused spot size, and signal-to-noise ratio. The description of the scalar diffraction modeling used to simulate an optical data storage system is reviewed. Operation of the magneto-optic data storage system and tradeoffs of superresolving techniques are discussed. The signal and noise spatial distribution in the pupil of an optical data storage system are shown to be different. For a particular spatial frequency bandwidth, the signal and noise are concentrated in different regions of the pupil. This understanding allows the use of optical filters that partially equalize the system transfer function and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. The main superresolution techniques investigated are those that increase the transmission of the higher spatial frequencies, or equalize the system transfer function, without changing the system cutoff frequency. The optical methods used to achieve superresolution are amplitude and phase filters placed in strategic system locations. One location influences the properties of the focused spot such as the irradiance distribution and width of the central core. Another location does not change the focused spot at all, but does change the signal and noise properties of the system. Electronic filtering techniques are also used to increase the transmission of the high spatial frequencies. The amplitude and phase filter sensitivities to aberration are also investigated. Optical properties of a new laser diode are investigated. The new laser diode has potential superresolving properties that are inherent to the device. Potential application of this device in an optical data storage device is presented. Another method of increasing the transmission of higher spatial frequencies within the system bandwidth and beyond the system cutoff frequency is to use adaptive optical systems. Adaptive systems for optical data storage are also discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Electronics and Electrical.; Physics, Optics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Milster, Tom D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSuperresolution applied to optical data storage systemsen_US
dc.creatorWalker, Edwin Parkeren_US
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Edwin Parkeren_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates superresolution applications in optical data storage systems. The performance of standard and superresolving magneto-optic data storage system are quantified by scalar diffraction modeling and experiments. Classical resolution measures are reviewed. Background on superresolution definitions and their conceptual development in scanning optical microscopes, optical data storage, and image processing is presented. Figures of merit for quantifying the performance of the systems are reviewed, such as system transfer function, two-point response, focused spot size, and signal-to-noise ratio. The description of the scalar diffraction modeling used to simulate an optical data storage system is reviewed. Operation of the magneto-optic data storage system and tradeoffs of superresolving techniques are discussed. The signal and noise spatial distribution in the pupil of an optical data storage system are shown to be different. For a particular spatial frequency bandwidth, the signal and noise are concentrated in different regions of the pupil. This understanding allows the use of optical filters that partially equalize the system transfer function and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. The main superresolution techniques investigated are those that increase the transmission of the higher spatial frequencies, or equalize the system transfer function, without changing the system cutoff frequency. The optical methods used to achieve superresolution are amplitude and phase filters placed in strategic system locations. One location influences the properties of the focused spot such as the irradiance distribution and width of the central core. Another location does not change the focused spot at all, but does change the signal and noise properties of the system. Electronic filtering techniques are also used to increase the transmission of the high spatial frequencies. The amplitude and phase filter sensitivities to aberration are also investigated. Optical properties of a new laser diode are investigated. The new laser diode has potential superresolving properties that are inherent to the device. Potential application of this device in an optical data storage device is presented. Another method of increasing the transmission of higher spatial frequencies within the system bandwidth and beyond the system cutoff frequency is to use adaptive optical systems. Adaptive systems for optical data storage are also discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMilster, Tom D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9957933en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40114491en_US
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