Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289039
Title:
The discourse between mentors and inductees in induction programs
Author:
Mundell, Scott Allen
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study examined the 23 most frequently cited areas of concern to new teachers from the existing literature, how frequently these topics were discussed during the induction mentoring process, and if their discussion improved participant satisfaction with the outcomes of the process. Additionally, it examined several characteristics of mentors and inductees to learn whether they effected the discourse between mentors and inductees during the induction process. A questionnaire based on the research literature in the area, was distributed to all members of inductee mentor pairs in the school district studied. A total of 272 questionnaires were returned in scorable condition, yielding a return rate of 96.4 percent. Data from the survey was used to answer a total of six research questions. Major conclusions were that there is: (1) a limited interaction between the length of time that a mentor has been teaching and the frequency of discourse. (2) A substantial interaction between the length of time that an inductee has been teaching and the frequency of discourse. (3) A minor interaction between the educational background of the mentor and the frequency of discourse. (4) A minor interaction between the educational background of the inductee and the frequency of discourse. (5) Frequent discussion of all 23 of the topics by the majority of induction mentoring pairs. (6) Significant interaction between the frequency with which the various topics of the study were discussed and the participants' satisfaction with the outcomes of each area of the induction mentoring process.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Administration.; Education, Teacher Training.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hendricks, J. Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe discourse between mentors and inductees in induction programsen_US
dc.creatorMundell, Scott Allenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMundell, Scott Allenen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study examined the 23 most frequently cited areas of concern to new teachers from the existing literature, how frequently these topics were discussed during the induction mentoring process, and if their discussion improved participant satisfaction with the outcomes of the process. Additionally, it examined several characteristics of mentors and inductees to learn whether they effected the discourse between mentors and inductees during the induction process. A questionnaire based on the research literature in the area, was distributed to all members of inductee mentor pairs in the school district studied. A total of 272 questionnaires were returned in scorable condition, yielding a return rate of 96.4 percent. Data from the survey was used to answer a total of six research questions. Major conclusions were that there is: (1) a limited interaction between the length of time that a mentor has been teaching and the frequency of discourse. (2) A substantial interaction between the length of time that an inductee has been teaching and the frequency of discourse. (3) A minor interaction between the educational background of the mentor and the frequency of discourse. (4) A minor interaction between the educational background of the inductee and the frequency of discourse. (5) Frequent discussion of all 23 of the topics by the majority of induction mentoring pairs. (6) Significant interaction between the frequency with which the various topics of the study were discussed and the participants' satisfaction with the outcomes of each area of the induction mentoring process.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHendricks, J. Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9946863en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39919912en_US
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