Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289037
Title:
Optical engineering of parallel optical data storage
Author:
McDonald, Mark Edmund
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Volume holographic data storage uses the superposition of image holograms in a suitable medium to pursue large storage capacity and high readout rates. The holographic method of structuring the medium with data, and subsequent readout of those data structures, relies on an optical system with two distinct paths. The object path is typically a 4F system relaying a high space-bandwidth-product object to an image plane with the storage medium placed near the Fourier plane. Optical system parallelism, measured by space-bandwidth-produce, promotes both storage capacity and readout rate. The reference path is typically a relay with the field stop placed near the center of the storage material. We will consider how the properties of the object path optical system affect the storage capacity and readout rate. We will demonstrate that the object beam 4F system can be optimized for the particular requirements of volume holographic storage, and that relatively simple optical systems can provide high parallelism. We will also consider the optical parallelism possible for standard optical disk storage, and how these results compare to volume holographic storage. Finally, we will consider how the optical system of the reference path affects the storage capacity. We find that modifications to the reference beam, or apodization, can substantially mitigate the effects of interpage crosstalk, a fundamental noise source in volume holographic storage.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Optics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Neifeld, Mark A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOptical engineering of parallel optical data storageen_US
dc.creatorMcDonald, Mark Edmunden_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Mark Edmunden_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractVolume holographic data storage uses the superposition of image holograms in a suitable medium to pursue large storage capacity and high readout rates. The holographic method of structuring the medium with data, and subsequent readout of those data structures, relies on an optical system with two distinct paths. The object path is typically a 4F system relaying a high space-bandwidth-product object to an image plane with the storage medium placed near the Fourier plane. Optical system parallelism, measured by space-bandwidth-produce, promotes both storage capacity and readout rate. The reference path is typically a relay with the field stop placed near the center of the storage material. We will consider how the properties of the object path optical system affect the storage capacity and readout rate. We will demonstrate that the object beam 4F system can be optimized for the particular requirements of volume holographic storage, and that relatively simple optical systems can provide high parallelism. We will also consider the optical parallelism possible for standard optical disk storage, and how these results compare to volume holographic storage. Finally, we will consider how the optical system of the reference path affects the storage capacity. We find that modifications to the reference beam, or apodization, can substantially mitigate the effects of interpage crosstalk, a fundamental noise source in volume holographic storage.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNeifeld, Mark A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9946859en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39918208en_US
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