Statistical analysis of large scale structure by the discrete wavelet transform

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289034
Title:
Statistical analysis of large scale structure by the discrete wavelet transform
Author:
Pando, Jesus, 1956-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is developed as a general statistical tool for the study of large scale structures (LSS) in astrophysics. The DWT is used in all aspects of structure identification including cluster analysis, spectrum and two-point correlation studies, scale-scale correlation analysis and to measure deviations from Gaussian behavior. The techniques developed are demonstrated on "academic" signals, on simulated models of the Lymanα (Lyα) forests, and on observational data of the Lyα forests. This technique can detect clustering in the Ly-α clouds where traditional techniques such as the two-point correlation function have failed. The position and strength of these clusters in both real and simulated data is determined and it is shown that clusters exist on scales as large as at least 20 h⁻¹ Mpc at significance levels of 2-4 σ. Furthermore, it is found that the strength distribution of the clusters can be used to distinguish between real data and simulated samples even where other traditional methods have failed to detect differences. Second, a method for measuring the power spectrum of a density field using the DWT is developed. All common features determined by the usual Fourier power spectrum can be calculated by the DWT. These features, such as the index of a power law or typical scales, can be detected even when the samples are geometrically complex, the samples are incomplete, or the mean density on larger scales is not known (the infrared uncertainty). Using this method the spectra of Ly-α forests in both simulated and real samples is calculated. Third, a method for measuring hierarchical clustering is introduced. Because hierarchical evolution is characterized by a set of rules of how larger dark matter halos are formed by the merging of smaller halos, scale-scale correlations of the density field should be one of the most sensitive quantities in determining the merging history. We show that these correlations can be completely determined by the correlations between discrete wavelet coefficients on adjacent scales and at nearly the same spatial position, Cs Scale-scale correlations on two samples of the QSO Ly-α forests absorption spectra are computed. Lastly, higher order statistics are developed to detect deviations from Gaussian behavior. These higher order statistics are necessary to fully characterize the Ly-α forests because the usual 2nd order statistics, such as the two-point correlation function or power spectrum, give inconclusive results. It is shown how this technique takes advantage of the locality of the DWT to circumvent the central limit theorem. A non-Gaussian spectrum is defined and this spectrum reveals not only the magnitude, but the scales of non-Gaussianity. When applied to simulated and observational samples of the Ly-α clouds, it is found that different popular models of structure formation have different spectra while two, independent observational data sets, have the same spectra. Moreover, the non-Gaussian spectra of real data sets are significantly different from the spectra of various possible random samples. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Astronomy and Astrophysics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Physics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fang, Li-Zhi

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStatistical analysis of large scale structure by the discrete wavelet transformen_US
dc.creatorPando, Jesus, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPando, Jesus, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is developed as a general statistical tool for the study of large scale structures (LSS) in astrophysics. The DWT is used in all aspects of structure identification including cluster analysis, spectrum and two-point correlation studies, scale-scale correlation analysis and to measure deviations from Gaussian behavior. The techniques developed are demonstrated on "academic" signals, on simulated models of the Lymanα (Lyα) forests, and on observational data of the Lyα forests. This technique can detect clustering in the Ly-α clouds where traditional techniques such as the two-point correlation function have failed. The position and strength of these clusters in both real and simulated data is determined and it is shown that clusters exist on scales as large as at least 20 h⁻¹ Mpc at significance levels of 2-4 σ. Furthermore, it is found that the strength distribution of the clusters can be used to distinguish between real data and simulated samples even where other traditional methods have failed to detect differences. Second, a method for measuring the power spectrum of a density field using the DWT is developed. All common features determined by the usual Fourier power spectrum can be calculated by the DWT. These features, such as the index of a power law or typical scales, can be detected even when the samples are geometrically complex, the samples are incomplete, or the mean density on larger scales is not known (the infrared uncertainty). Using this method the spectra of Ly-α forests in both simulated and real samples is calculated. Third, a method for measuring hierarchical clustering is introduced. Because hierarchical evolution is characterized by a set of rules of how larger dark matter halos are formed by the merging of smaller halos, scale-scale correlations of the density field should be one of the most sensitive quantities in determining the merging history. We show that these correlations can be completely determined by the correlations between discrete wavelet coefficients on adjacent scales and at nearly the same spatial position, Cs Scale-scale correlations on two samples of the QSO Ly-α forests absorption spectra are computed. Lastly, higher order statistics are developed to detect deviations from Gaussian behavior. These higher order statistics are necessary to fully characterize the Ly-α forests because the usual 2nd order statistics, such as the two-point correlation function or power spectrum, give inconclusive results. It is shown how this technique takes advantage of the locality of the DWT to circumvent the central limit theorem. A non-Gaussian spectrum is defined and this spectrum reveals not only the magnitude, but the scales of non-Gaussianity. When applied to simulated and observational samples of the Ly-α clouds, it is found that different popular models of structure formation have different spectra while two, independent observational data sets, have the same spectra. Moreover, the non-Gaussian spectra of real data sets are significantly different from the spectra of various possible random samples. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Astronomy and Astrophysics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFang, Li-Zhien_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729480en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34811886en_US
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