The relationship among preservice music education teachers' conceptions of teaching effectiveness, microteaching experiences, and teaching performance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289016
Title:
The relationship among preservice music education teachers' conceptions of teaching effectiveness, microteaching experiences, and teaching performance
Author:
Butler, Abigail
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Fifteen undergraduate music education majors enrolled in an introductory music education course at a major university in the Southwestern United States participated in this study. Students constructed concept maps on the topic teacher effectiveness as a measure of their cognitive schemata. They completed two microteaching lessons in two different settings which were videotaped and subsequently analyzed using the Survey of Teaching Effectiveness and a time sampling procedure using criteria from teacher intensity research. Following their microteachings students constructed a second concept map on the same topic. Students were interviewed to explore the nature of their thinking about effective teaching. Quantitative analyses were conducted using data from the concept maps and both measures of teacher effectiveness. Results of a dependent t-test showed no significance difference between map scores either for total score or component scores of extensiveness and coherence. Spearman Rank Correlations were calculated between map scores and subjects' scores on both the STE and TI measures. No significant correlations were found to exist. Qualitative analyses were completed based on data from concept maps, self-evaluations, and interviews. Frequency responses by categories and data source indicated subjects' responses fell into two main areas: teacher effectiveness and skills and strategies. Within these two areas four sub-categories were targeted for further analysis: knowledge, teacher traits, delivery and instructional skills. Frequency responses for all but delivery skills were quite high. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) Preservice teachers have a clear picture of what it means to be an effective teacher. They describe an effective teacher as knowledgeable, possessing a variety of personal characteristics, and engaging in specific teacher actions. (2) Preservice teachers' cognitive structure does not change after the completion of two microteaching experiences. There is some indication that changes in the content of their thinking arise following their microteachings. (3) There is no relationship between preservice teachers' cognitive structure and their ability to demonstrate effective teaching behaviors. However, qualitative analyses suggest a possible connection between the content of their thinking and their ability to teach effectively. Implications for education and future research are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Music.; Education, Teacher Training.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dunn, Dwayne E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe relationship among preservice music education teachers' conceptions of teaching effectiveness, microteaching experiences, and teaching performanceen_US
dc.creatorButler, Abigailen_US
dc.contributor.authorButler, Abigailen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFifteen undergraduate music education majors enrolled in an introductory music education course at a major university in the Southwestern United States participated in this study. Students constructed concept maps on the topic teacher effectiveness as a measure of their cognitive schemata. They completed two microteaching lessons in two different settings which were videotaped and subsequently analyzed using the Survey of Teaching Effectiveness and a time sampling procedure using criteria from teacher intensity research. Following their microteachings students constructed a second concept map on the same topic. Students were interviewed to explore the nature of their thinking about effective teaching. Quantitative analyses were conducted using data from the concept maps and both measures of teacher effectiveness. Results of a dependent t-test showed no significance difference between map scores either for total score or component scores of extensiveness and coherence. Spearman Rank Correlations were calculated between map scores and subjects' scores on both the STE and TI measures. No significant correlations were found to exist. Qualitative analyses were completed based on data from concept maps, self-evaluations, and interviews. Frequency responses by categories and data source indicated subjects' responses fell into two main areas: teacher effectiveness and skills and strategies. Within these two areas four sub-categories were targeted for further analysis: knowledge, teacher traits, delivery and instructional skills. Frequency responses for all but delivery skills were quite high. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) Preservice teachers have a clear picture of what it means to be an effective teacher. They describe an effective teacher as knowledgeable, possessing a variety of personal characteristics, and engaging in specific teacher actions. (2) Preservice teachers' cognitive structure does not change after the completion of two microteaching experiences. There is some indication that changes in the content of their thinking arise following their microteachings. (3) There is no relationship between preservice teachers' cognitive structure and their ability to demonstrate effective teaching behaviors. However, qualitative analyses suggest a possible connection between the content of their thinking and their ability to teach effectively. Implications for education and future research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDunn, Dwayne E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9946807en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39914446en_US
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