Potters and politics: Factionalism and the organization of ceramic production in Paradijon, the Philippines

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289004
Title:
Potters and politics: Factionalism and the organization of ceramic production in Paradijon, the Philippines
Author:
Neupert, Mark Alexander
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is an ethnoarchaeological study of the organization of traditional pottery manufacture the barrio of Paradijon, Gubat, Sorsogon Province, the Philippines. The potters of Paradijon have been drawn into political competition between elite members of the community, which has led to factionalism among the potting community. This research uses a case study approach to identify how traditional, independent potters become involved in elite competition, and the effect such involvement has on traditional pottery manufacture and its material record. The organization of ceramic production has become a mainstay in archaeological investigation. Within the case study context, this research seeks to contribute to the field along several fronts. First, this research re-examines the topic of the organization of production and suggests that the use of Contingency Theory will advance archaeological understanding of organizational behavior. Second, the participation of independent craft specialists in elite competition is described and explained. Third, a detailed analysis of the traditional technology of production in Paradijon is provided and the rejection of modern pottery technology introduced by the Philippine federal government is examined. Fourth, a social network analysis is used to illustrate the effect of factionalism on informal organizational complexity within specialist communities. And fifth, this research tests the ability of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis for discerning factional competition in the material record, and illustrates the ways in which sociopolitical behavior creates patterning in material culture.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Anthropology, Cultural.; Sociology, Theory and Methods.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Longacre, William A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePotters and politics: Factionalism and the organization of ceramic production in Paradijon, the Philippinesen_US
dc.creatorNeupert, Mark Alexanderen_US
dc.contributor.authorNeupert, Mark Alexanderen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is an ethnoarchaeological study of the organization of traditional pottery manufacture the barrio of Paradijon, Gubat, Sorsogon Province, the Philippines. The potters of Paradijon have been drawn into political competition between elite members of the community, which has led to factionalism among the potting community. This research uses a case study approach to identify how traditional, independent potters become involved in elite competition, and the effect such involvement has on traditional pottery manufacture and its material record. The organization of ceramic production has become a mainstay in archaeological investigation. Within the case study context, this research seeks to contribute to the field along several fronts. First, this research re-examines the topic of the organization of production and suggests that the use of Contingency Theory will advance archaeological understanding of organizational behavior. Second, the participation of independent craft specialists in elite competition is described and explained. Third, a detailed analysis of the traditional technology of production in Paradijon is provided and the rejection of modern pottery technology introduced by the Philippine federal government is examined. Fourth, a social network analysis is used to illustrate the effect of factionalism on informal organizational complexity within specialist communities. And fifth, this research tests the ability of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis for discerning factional competition in the material record, and illustrates the ways in which sociopolitical behavior creates patterning in material culture.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Theory and Methods.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLongacre, William A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9946778en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39888381en_US
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