Fighting in the streets: Ethnic succession, competition, and riot violence in four American cities

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288982
Title:
Fighting in the streets: Ethnic succession, competition, and riot violence in four American cities
Author:
Herman, Max Authur
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research addresses where and why interethnic violence occurred during four major urban riots of the 20th Century: The Chicago Riot of 1919, The Detroit Riot of 1943, the Miami Riot of 1980, and the Los Angeles Riot of 1992. Employing a multi-method approach, including historical accounts, statistical modeling of census data, and geographic information systems (GIS) analysis, I investigate whether an explanatory model combining elements of ethnic succession and competition perspectives on riot violence is generalizable to both recent riot events in Miami and Los Angeles and earlier riots in Chicago and Detroit. Such explanation emphasizes the effects of internal and international migration on the racial/ethnic composition of neighborhoods, competition for jobs and housing, and the intensity of riot violence at the census tract level. I find support for a combined ethnic succession and ethnic competition interpretation of riot violence in all four events. I conclude by highlighting the similar effects of the Great Migration on rioting in Chicago and Detroit and recent waves of immigration on rioting in Miami and Los Angeles. I argue that to make sense of recent rioting in Miami and Los Angeles we must be willing to engage in historical comparisons and examine the local dynamics of inter-ethnic violence in cases past and present. We must look beyond the black/white race relations paradigm towards a general model of collective violence that is independent of the specific actors involved, a model that takes the changing racial/ethnic composition of American cities into account.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, United States.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.; Sociology, Demography.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bergesen, Albert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFighting in the streets: Ethnic succession, competition, and riot violence in four American citiesen_US
dc.creatorHerman, Max Authuren_US
dc.contributor.authorHerman, Max Authuren_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research addresses where and why interethnic violence occurred during four major urban riots of the 20th Century: The Chicago Riot of 1919, The Detroit Riot of 1943, the Miami Riot of 1980, and the Los Angeles Riot of 1992. Employing a multi-method approach, including historical accounts, statistical modeling of census data, and geographic information systems (GIS) analysis, I investigate whether an explanatory model combining elements of ethnic succession and competition perspectives on riot violence is generalizable to both recent riot events in Miami and Los Angeles and earlier riots in Chicago and Detroit. Such explanation emphasizes the effects of internal and international migration on the racial/ethnic composition of neighborhoods, competition for jobs and housing, and the intensity of riot violence at the census tract level. I find support for a combined ethnic succession and ethnic competition interpretation of riot violence in all four events. I conclude by highlighting the similar effects of the Great Migration on rioting in Chicago and Detroit and recent waves of immigration on rioting in Miami and Los Angeles. I argue that to make sense of recent rioting in Miami and Los Angeles we must be willing to engage in historical comparisons and examine the local dynamics of inter-ethnic violence in cases past and present. We must look beyond the black/white race relations paradigm towards a general model of collective violence that is independent of the specific actors involved, a model that takes the changing racial/ethnic composition of American cities into account.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Demography.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBergesen, Alberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927515en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39570265en_US
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