Academic English is no one's first language: A multidisciplinary approach to teaching writing

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288964
Title:
Academic English is no one's first language: A multidisciplinary approach to teaching writing
Author:
Culp, Lisa-Anne
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study argues for sociolinguistics to be foundational to an adequate theory of rhetoric, and the need for composition teachers to view academic written English as a second language. By viewing academic written English as a second language, it is easier to see (1) how native students' struggles to learn genre or rhetorical conventions are similar to second-language acquisition problems, and (2) why there is a need for the development of multidisciplinary curricula and research using both pedagogical and research strategies from the rhetoric/composition and second-language acquisition fields. The goal of this study is to examine under what conditions analytical skills can be developed in students that they can later transfer from one genre or discipline to another. Chapter 1 gives a background and overview of the study. Chapter 2 describes how and why sociolinguistics should be a basis for rhetoric and composition; introduces the connection between sociolinguistics and academic English as a form of discourse; and describes the benefits of a multidisciplinary base for composition research and pedagogy. Chapter 3 further examines how the theory that academic English should be seen as a second language offers great insights from the ESL field as to the cause of (and potential solutions to) student writing errors. Chapter 4 describes a multidisciplinary curriculum based on English for Specific Purposes (ESP) needs analysis methodology. The model for teaching composition that is offered teaches students how to deconstruct popular culture and academic genres using genre, rhetorical, and discourse analysis, and ethnographic techniques; extends the use of contrastive rhetoric from a means of looking at cultural differences to a method of exploring differences in disciplinary discourse, and teaches composition teachers how to use popular culture texts as analytical tools. The result is a new type of composition curriculum designed to develop analytical skills in students that will enable them to discover the rhetorical character and conventions of academic disciplines, master academic discourse, and expand their repertoire of options and strategies for communicating in writing. Chapter 5 describes how this curriculum was evaluated using an educational ethnographic approach. Chapters 6, 7, and 8 describe the four case studies. And Chapter 9 reviews the findings from evaluations of the case studies, and offers suggestions for future research utilizing this approach to teaching composition.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Linguistics.; Language, Rhetoric and Composition.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enos, Therasa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAcademic English is no one's first language: A multidisciplinary approach to teaching writingen_US
dc.creatorCulp, Lisa-Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorCulp, Lisa-Anneen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study argues for sociolinguistics to be foundational to an adequate theory of rhetoric, and the need for composition teachers to view academic written English as a second language. By viewing academic written English as a second language, it is easier to see (1) how native students' struggles to learn genre or rhetorical conventions are similar to second-language acquisition problems, and (2) why there is a need for the development of multidisciplinary curricula and research using both pedagogical and research strategies from the rhetoric/composition and second-language acquisition fields. The goal of this study is to examine under what conditions analytical skills can be developed in students that they can later transfer from one genre or discipline to another. Chapter 1 gives a background and overview of the study. Chapter 2 describes how and why sociolinguistics should be a basis for rhetoric and composition; introduces the connection between sociolinguistics and academic English as a form of discourse; and describes the benefits of a multidisciplinary base for composition research and pedagogy. Chapter 3 further examines how the theory that academic English should be seen as a second language offers great insights from the ESL field as to the cause of (and potential solutions to) student writing errors. Chapter 4 describes a multidisciplinary curriculum based on English for Specific Purposes (ESP) needs analysis methodology. The model for teaching composition that is offered teaches students how to deconstruct popular culture and academic genres using genre, rhetorical, and discourse analysis, and ethnographic techniques; extends the use of contrastive rhetoric from a means of looking at cultural differences to a method of exploring differences in disciplinary discourse, and teaches composition teachers how to use popular culture texts as analytical tools. The result is a new type of composition curriculum designed to develop analytical skills in students that will enable them to discover the rhetorical character and conventions of academic disciplines, master academic discourse, and expand their repertoire of options and strategies for communicating in writing. Chapter 5 describes how this curriculum was evaluated using an educational ethnographic approach. Chapters 6, 7, and 8 describe the four case studies. And Chapter 9 reviews the findings from evaluations of the case studies, and offers suggestions for future research utilizing this approach to teaching composition.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Rhetoric and Composition.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnos, Therasaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927467en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39560168en_US
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