The architecture of Grasshopper Pueblo: Dynamics of form, function, and use of space in a prehistoric community

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288961
Title:
The architecture of Grasshopper Pueblo: Dynamics of form, function, and use of space in a prehistoric community
Author:
Riggs, Charles Ross, Jr., 1967-
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Architecture can be an enigmatic class of material culture to understand archaeologically and a single approach to its analysis has defied archaeologists. This study views pueblos as analogous to organisms that are constantly developing and degenerating. The ability to draw behavioral inferences from the architecture of Grasshopper Pueblo (A.D. 1300-1400) is impacted not only by these everyday processes of growth and degeneration, but also by the activities of the different social or ethnic groups who were responsible for assembling the pueblo. Fortunately, this study benefits from a long and productive history of architectural research in the American Southwest and from a thirty-year excavation program at Grasshopper itself, which produced a large and representative sample of this complex architectural organism. This extensive sample insures reliable inferences about the growth and degeneration of Grasshopper Pueblo because it is representative of the parameters of time, space, and behavior at the site. This study reinforces previous work at Grasshopper and provides new insights into intrasite community dynamics that have implications for both Grasshopper research and for studies of architecture and community patterns at other southwestern pueblo sites.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Architecture.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reid, J. Jefferson

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe architecture of Grasshopper Pueblo: Dynamics of form, function, and use of space in a prehistoric communityen_US
dc.creatorRiggs, Charles Ross, Jr., 1967-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRiggs, Charles Ross, Jr., 1967-en_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractArchitecture can be an enigmatic class of material culture to understand archaeologically and a single approach to its analysis has defied archaeologists. This study views pueblos as analogous to organisms that are constantly developing and degenerating. The ability to draw behavioral inferences from the architecture of Grasshopper Pueblo (A.D. 1300-1400) is impacted not only by these everyday processes of growth and degeneration, but also by the activities of the different social or ethnic groups who were responsible for assembling the pueblo. Fortunately, this study benefits from a long and productive history of architectural research in the American Southwest and from a thirty-year excavation program at Grasshopper itself, which produced a large and representative sample of this complex architectural organism. This extensive sample insures reliable inferences about the growth and degeneration of Grasshopper Pueblo because it is representative of the parameters of time, space, and behavior at the site. This study reinforces previous work at Grasshopper and provides new insights into intrasite community dynamics that have implications for both Grasshopper research and for studies of architecture and community patterns at other southwestern pueblo sites.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927460en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39559919en_US
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