The effects of practice on the reading rate, accuracy, duration, and visual fatigue of students with low vision when accessing standard-size print with optical devices

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288955
Title:
The effects of practice on the reading rate, accuracy, duration, and visual fatigue of students with low vision when accessing standard-size print with optical devices
Author:
Smith, Janice Kay
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There is a limited understanding of the effects of practice on reading efficiency and comfort when students with low vision read standard print with optical devices. This descriptive study used a multiple baseline single-subject design to examine effects of practice on the reading rate, accuracy, duration and visual fatigue of three high school students with visual impairments when they read standard print with newly prescribed optical devices (reading spectacles). The study also examined differences between measures of reading efficiency and comfort when students read large print without optical devices and when they read standard print with optical devices. Baseline data were collected prior to intervention. Intervention consisted of daily practice sessions reading novels in standard print with individually prescribed optical devices for a maximum of thirty-eight minutes. Measures of reading efficiency and comfort were graphed daily during baseline and intervention. Oral reading rate, accuracy, and comprehension were probed during intervention and maintenance. A positive relationship between practice and oral reading rate was demonstrated for three students and a positive relationship for silent reading rate for two students. No relationship was demonstrated between practice and duration nor between practice and fatigue. One student maintained oral reading rate three weeks after cessation of practice sessions. There were no advantages for reading large print over reading standard print with optical devices for two of the students on measures of reading rate, accuracy, or duration; one student demonstrated no differences between reading media while the other demonstrated faster reading rates with standard print. One student demonstrated no differences in accuracy, but faster rates and longer duration with large print. Although students reported the same symptoms of visual fatigue with both media, they demonstrated more frequent occurrences of fatigue when reading standard print with optical devices. All expressed preference for reading standard print with reading spectacles. Reasons included portability, availability of materials, and social implications. There were two additional findings not related to the purposes of this study. Although all students were proficient readers, their oral and silent reading rates were almost equivalent. Individual patterns of miscues appeared to reflect students' visual field losses.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Special.; Education, Reading.; Education, Technology of.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Erin, Jane N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effects of practice on the reading rate, accuracy, duration, and visual fatigue of students with low vision when accessing standard-size print with optical devicesen_US
dc.creatorSmith, Janice Kayen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Janice Kayen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere is a limited understanding of the effects of practice on reading efficiency and comfort when students with low vision read standard print with optical devices. This descriptive study used a multiple baseline single-subject design to examine effects of practice on the reading rate, accuracy, duration and visual fatigue of three high school students with visual impairments when they read standard print with newly prescribed optical devices (reading spectacles). The study also examined differences between measures of reading efficiency and comfort when students read large print without optical devices and when they read standard print with optical devices. Baseline data were collected prior to intervention. Intervention consisted of daily practice sessions reading novels in standard print with individually prescribed optical devices for a maximum of thirty-eight minutes. Measures of reading efficiency and comfort were graphed daily during baseline and intervention. Oral reading rate, accuracy, and comprehension were probed during intervention and maintenance. A positive relationship between practice and oral reading rate was demonstrated for three students and a positive relationship for silent reading rate for two students. No relationship was demonstrated between practice and duration nor between practice and fatigue. One student maintained oral reading rate three weeks after cessation of practice sessions. There were no advantages for reading large print over reading standard print with optical devices for two of the students on measures of reading rate, accuracy, or duration; one student demonstrated no differences between reading media while the other demonstrated faster reading rates with standard print. One student demonstrated no differences in accuracy, but faster rates and longer duration with large print. Although students reported the same symptoms of visual fatigue with both media, they demonstrated more frequent occurrences of fatigue when reading standard print with optical devices. All expressed preference for reading standard print with reading spectacles. Reasons included portability, availability of materials, and social implications. There were two additional findings not related to the purposes of this study. Although all students were proficient readers, their oral and silent reading rates were almost equivalent. Individual patterns of miscues appeared to reflect students' visual field losses.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Reading.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorErin, Jane N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927449en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39559336en_US
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