Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288890
Title:
Early field experience: Four perspectives
Author:
Burant, Theresa Jean, 1958-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Early field experiences (EFEs) are common in teacher education; yet, there is conflicting evidence regarding their value as educative experiences. As the need for preparing prospective teachers for diversity becomes more urgent, research that attends to the context, content, and experiences of preservice teachers in EFEs in diverse schools is necessary. In this study, qualitative case study methodology was used to understand the experiences of preservice teachers, and the meanings they constructed of these experiences, in a reconceptualized EFE in teacher education. The EFE consisted of a team-taught, integrated combination of a general methods course (with a classroom, school, and community-focused field experience), and a foundations of education course, situated in the context of an urban middle/elementary school with a diverse student population. The sample consisted of four preservice teachers: a Mexican-American woman, an American Indian man, and two White women. Data were collected over a period of five months using participant observation, document analysis, interviews, and focus groups. Constant comparison and analytic induction were used to analyze data. Cases of the experiences of the participants revealed three major themes: (a) participation in varied communities; (b) use of multiple literacies to make sense of experience; and, (c) transformations in practices, understandings, and voice. Implications for teacher education from these cases address curriculum and pedagogy in EFEs, experiences that follow EFEs, admissions criteria, and recruitment of members of under-represented groups into teaching.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Teacher Training.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Teaching and Teacher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Doyle, Walter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEarly field experience: Four perspectivesen_US
dc.creatorBurant, Theresa Jean, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurant, Theresa Jean, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEarly field experiences (EFEs) are common in teacher education; yet, there is conflicting evidence regarding their value as educative experiences. As the need for preparing prospective teachers for diversity becomes more urgent, research that attends to the context, content, and experiences of preservice teachers in EFEs in diverse schools is necessary. In this study, qualitative case study methodology was used to understand the experiences of preservice teachers, and the meanings they constructed of these experiences, in a reconceptualized EFE in teacher education. The EFE consisted of a team-taught, integrated combination of a general methods course (with a classroom, school, and community-focused field experience), and a foundations of education course, situated in the context of an urban middle/elementary school with a diverse student population. The sample consisted of four preservice teachers: a Mexican-American woman, an American Indian man, and two White women. Data were collected over a period of five months using participant observation, document analysis, interviews, and focus groups. Constant comparison and analytic induction were used to analyze data. Cases of the experiences of the participants revealed three major themes: (a) participation in varied communities; (b) use of multiple literacies to make sense of experience; and, (c) transformations in practices, understandings, and voice. Implications for teacher education from these cases address curriculum and pedagogy in EFEs, experiences that follow EFEs, admissions criteria, and recruitment of members of under-represented groups into teaching.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDoyle, Walteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9901768en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38830383en_US
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