Deforestation in Rondonia, Brazil: Frontier urbanization and landscape change

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288864
Title:
Deforestation in Rondonia, Brazil: Frontier urbanization and landscape change
Author:
Hayes-Bohanan, James Kezar, 1963-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Between 1960 and 1991, the population of Rondonia, Brazil increased from 70,000 to 1.3 million. This increase occurred during the thirty-year period bracketing the rise to statehood, during which a rural population also became largely urban. Simultaneously, the loss of tropical rain forest in the state progressed at unparalleled rates. This dissertation examines some of the ways in which these two rapidly changing aspects of Rondonia's landscape are related to each other. The research project employs a framework grounded in realist philosophy, a flexible approach that facilitates research into processes that are unfolding at a regional scale but which occur within the context of broader national and international structures. Several kinds of connections between urban population growth and deforestation are examined, including land conversion for urban use, food consumption in urban areas, wood consumption for housing in urban areas, and power consumption in urban areas. Urban sprawl is found to be significantly and positively correlated with deforestation at the municipio level, but the absolute magnitude of urban sprawl is very small relative to total deforestation. No spatial correlation is found between urban settlement and the dedication of land to food crops. A weak but positive correlation is found between urban demand for timber and total deforestation, but the absolute magnitude of local timber demand is found to be very small in comparison to forest clearing. The recent diversification of the timber industry in order to absorb urban labor may have profound implications for demand on forest resources in the future. Electricity generation has been destructive of rain forest, and capacity already under construction is likely to have further such impacts. The cultural landscape of Rondonia reflects an orientation that is increasingly outward-looking. Rondonia's cities and towns are becoming more closely connected with one another and more fully integrated with the outside world. Early incentives to settle in Rondonia contributed to deforestation, but the curtailment of these incentives did not curtail deforestation. Rondonia is a place caught between two opposite pressures: the pressure to preserve the rain forest and the pressure to participate in the world economy as consumers.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geography.; Physical Geography.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.; Environmental Sciences.; Urban and Regional Planning.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography and Regional Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Waterstone, Marvin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDeforestation in Rondonia, Brazil: Frontier urbanization and landscape changeen_US
dc.creatorHayes-Bohanan, James Kezar, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHayes-Bohanan, James Kezar, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBetween 1960 and 1991, the population of Rondonia, Brazil increased from 70,000 to 1.3 million. This increase occurred during the thirty-year period bracketing the rise to statehood, during which a rural population also became largely urban. Simultaneously, the loss of tropical rain forest in the state progressed at unparalleled rates. This dissertation examines some of the ways in which these two rapidly changing aspects of Rondonia's landscape are related to each other. The research project employs a framework grounded in realist philosophy, a flexible approach that facilitates research into processes that are unfolding at a regional scale but which occur within the context of broader national and international structures. Several kinds of connections between urban population growth and deforestation are examined, including land conversion for urban use, food consumption in urban areas, wood consumption for housing in urban areas, and power consumption in urban areas. Urban sprawl is found to be significantly and positively correlated with deforestation at the municipio level, but the absolute magnitude of urban sprawl is very small relative to total deforestation. No spatial correlation is found between urban settlement and the dedication of land to food crops. A weak but positive correlation is found between urban demand for timber and total deforestation, but the absolute magnitude of local timber demand is found to be very small in comparison to forest clearing. The recent diversification of the timber industry in order to absorb urban labor may have profound implications for demand on forest resources in the future. Electricity generation has been destructive of rain forest, and capacity already under construction is likely to have further such impacts. The cultural landscape of Rondonia reflects an orientation that is increasingly outward-looking. Rondonia's cities and towns are becoming more closely connected with one another and more fully integrated with the outside world. Early incentives to settle in Rondonia contributed to deforestation, but the curtailment of these incentives did not curtail deforestation. Rondonia is a place caught between two opposite pressures: the pressure to preserve the rain forest and the pressure to participate in the world economy as consumers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
dc.subjectPhysical Geography.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectUrban and Regional Planning.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWaterstone, Marvinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9901679en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38824401en_US
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