Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288863
Title:
Logistics with competing users
Author:
Shen, Ling, 1969-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation addresses a class of fundamental logistical problems where two or more potential users (or players) compete for a common set of resources. Each user has a criterion (cost or performance requirement) that he/she wishes to optimize. The users' criteria are often in conflict, that is, choosing a decision that optimizes one user's criterion may not also optimize the criteria of others. How should the resources be utilized to satisfy the user demands? In this dissertation, optimization and game theoretical models are employed to examine the equilibrium points and efficiently find the frontier of non-dominated solutions to three logistics problems with competing users: (1) single machine scheduling, (2) network resource allocation and (3) assignment to multiple servers (queues). New cooperative game theoretic methods are developed to negotiate on the Pareto frontier. In addition, a Stackelberg leader-follower game framework is introduced in a queueing system which includes both competitive users and competitive servers. The existence of a unique equilibrium is shown. The models and methodologies developed in the dissertation can be applied in many areas, such as Internet pricing, scheduling resources among competitors, network routing of users' requirements, analysis of competitive market, etc.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Industrial.; Engineering, System Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Systems and Industrial Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mirchandani, Pitu B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLogistics with competing usersen_US
dc.creatorShen, Ling, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Ling, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation addresses a class of fundamental logistical problems where two or more potential users (or players) compete for a common set of resources. Each user has a criterion (cost or performance requirement) that he/she wishes to optimize. The users' criteria are often in conflict, that is, choosing a decision that optimizes one user's criterion may not also optimize the criteria of others. How should the resources be utilized to satisfy the user demands? In this dissertation, optimization and game theoretical models are employed to examine the equilibrium points and efficiently find the frontier of non-dominated solutions to three logistics problems with competing users: (1) single machine scheduling, (2) network resource allocation and (3) assignment to multiple servers (queues). New cooperative game theoretic methods are developed to negotiate on the Pareto frontier. In addition, a Stackelberg leader-follower game framework is introduced in a queueing system which includes both competitive users and competitive servers. The existence of a unique equilibrium is shown. The models and methodologies developed in the dissertation can be applied in many areas, such as Internet pricing, scheduling resources among competitors, network routing of users' requirements, analysis of competitive market, etc.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Industrial.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, System Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSystems and Industrial Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMirchandani, Pitu B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9901678en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38822969en_US
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