A consumer-based theory of strong brands and its implications for brand equity and brand management

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288858
Title:
A consumer-based theory of strong brands and its implications for brand equity and brand management
Author:
Das, Samar Kumar, 1956-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The power of brands like Coke, Levi's and Nike defies conventional understanding. How do such strong brands get created? What are the sources of their phenomenal strength? The traditional thinking reflected in the brand literature traces the sources of brand strength to the consumer's cognitive knowledge of brand's functional and image attributes, and other associations linked to the brand. I draw upon past research in marketing and social psychology to propose a user-centered view of brand strength. I suggest that loyal consumers actively create 'brandspaces' based on personal, social and cultural factors. These brand knowledge structures may be more insular since they are self generated and anchored in the personal and social self of the user. In Essay 1 of this dissertation, I take the user-centered approach to propose a method for mapping and measuring consumer-based brand equity. I developed a structural model for the sneakers product category with five consumer-based sources of brand equity ('functional attributes','brand image','appeal', 'self-brand relationship', and 'perceived popularity') as independent variables, and study their impact on a four indicator measure of brand equity. In Essay 2, I investigate the role of self-brand relationship schema in promoting insularity of strong brands. I hypothesize that strong brand users, who have high self-brand relationship, suppress or discount negative brand information, as compared to strong users who have low self-brand relationship. Experimental results confirm this central hypothesis. This study clearly shows the centrality of self-brand relationship in promoting brand insularity and brand strength.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Marketing.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Industrial Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brucks, Merrie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA consumer-based theory of strong brands and its implications for brand equity and brand managementen_US
dc.creatorDas, Samar Kumar, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDas, Samar Kumar, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe power of brands like Coke, Levi's and Nike defies conventional understanding. How do such strong brands get created? What are the sources of their phenomenal strength? The traditional thinking reflected in the brand literature traces the sources of brand strength to the consumer's cognitive knowledge of brand's functional and image attributes, and other associations linked to the brand. I draw upon past research in marketing and social psychology to propose a user-centered view of brand strength. I suggest that loyal consumers actively create 'brandspaces' based on personal, social and cultural factors. These brand knowledge structures may be more insular since they are self generated and anchored in the personal and social self of the user. In Essay 1 of this dissertation, I take the user-centered approach to propose a method for mapping and measuring consumer-based brand equity. I developed a structural model for the sneakers product category with five consumer-based sources of brand equity ('functional attributes','brand image','appeal', 'self-brand relationship', and 'perceived popularity') as independent variables, and study their impact on a four indicator measure of brand equity. In Essay 2, I investigate the role of self-brand relationship schema in promoting insularity of strong brands. I hypothesize that strong brand users, who have high self-brand relationship, suppress or discount negative brand information, as compared to strong users who have low self-brand relationship. Experimental results confirm this central hypothesis. This study clearly shows the centrality of self-brand relationship in promoting brand insularity and brand strength.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrucks, Merrieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9901664en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38796867en_US
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