The firm's capital structure decision: Market power, debt maturity, and uncertain cash flows

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288851
Title:
The firm's capital structure decision: Market power, debt maturity, and uncertain cash flows
Author:
Dickerson, Steven Scott, 1966-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A current outgrowth of the nearly four decades of research in capital structure is the investigation of linkages between the firm's decisions and factors outside of strictly financial determinants. The three essays that comprise this dissertation offer contributions to this area of research. The first essay explores the connection between the product market and the firm's financial decisions. I hypothesize that market power acts as a buffer against strategic action on the part of a competitor and the existence of market power allows the firm to hold more debt in its capital structure. Using a binary choice model, I find that firms with market power have a higher propensity to issue public debt rather than public equity. In addition, no evidence is found suggesting agency costs have a significant impact on the security issue decision. The second essay is an extension of an analytical model of the free-cash-flow hypothesis developed by Stulz (1990). Debt can increase the value of a firm by reducing the amount of cash the manager can misappropriate or invest in personal projects. The extension is developed under the assumption that the stockholders do not know with certainty the mean of the cash flow distribution. The extension drives two main results: one, the amount of debt in the capital structure of a firm is dependent upon the precision of the shareholders' a priori estimate of future cash flows; and, two, the maturity of the firm's debt is dependent upon the shareholders' estimate of the mean of future cash flow. The third essay empirically explores the relationship between the firm's maturity structure of debt and the firm's maturity structure of assets. New variables are constructed to specifically test the maturity-matching hypothesis. The dependent variable is the change in average maturity of debt caused by a new issue. An independent variable measures the difference between the average maturity of debt and the average maturity of assets. I find statistically significant evidence supporting the maturity-matching hypothesis and inconsistent support for the agency hypothesis.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Management.; Economics, Commerce-Business.; Economics, Finance.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Economics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fishback, Price

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe firm's capital structure decision: Market power, debt maturity, and uncertain cash flowsen_US
dc.creatorDickerson, Steven Scott, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDickerson, Steven Scott, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA current outgrowth of the nearly four decades of research in capital structure is the investigation of linkages between the firm's decisions and factors outside of strictly financial determinants. The three essays that comprise this dissertation offer contributions to this area of research. The first essay explores the connection between the product market and the firm's financial decisions. I hypothesize that market power acts as a buffer against strategic action on the part of a competitor and the existence of market power allows the firm to hold more debt in its capital structure. Using a binary choice model, I find that firms with market power have a higher propensity to issue public debt rather than public equity. In addition, no evidence is found suggesting agency costs have a significant impact on the security issue decision. The second essay is an extension of an analytical model of the free-cash-flow hypothesis developed by Stulz (1990). Debt can increase the value of a firm by reducing the amount of cash the manager can misappropriate or invest in personal projects. The extension is developed under the assumption that the stockholders do not know with certainty the mean of the cash flow distribution. The extension drives two main results: one, the amount of debt in the capital structure of a firm is dependent upon the precision of the shareholders' a priori estimate of future cash flows; and, two, the maturity of the firm's debt is dependent upon the shareholders' estimate of the mean of future cash flow. The third essay empirically explores the relationship between the firm's maturity structure of debt and the firm's maturity structure of assets. New variables are constructed to specifically test the maturity-matching hypothesis. The dependent variable is the change in average maturity of debt caused by a new issue. An independent variable measures the difference between the average maturity of debt and the average maturity of assets. I find statistically significant evidence supporting the maturity-matching hypothesis and inconsistent support for the agency hypothesis.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Commerce-Business.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Finance.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFishback, Priceen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9901651en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38785468en_US
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