'A mirror of Indian newes': North American Indian ethnographic writing in Richard Hakluyt's "Principall Navigations of the English Nation (1598-1600)''

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288846
Title:
'A mirror of Indian newes': North American Indian ethnographic writing in Richard Hakluyt's "Principall Navigations of the English Nation (1598-1600)''
Author:
Berk, Ari David, 1967-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The publication of texts describing the first Anglo-Indian encounters in Richard Hakluyt's three volume work, Principall Navigations of the English Nation, published between 1598-1600, was driven by the desire to make complex and descriptive writings both comprehensible and usable to a sixteenth century audience. These texts, while they contain valuable ethnographic material, are nonetheless shaped and constrained by the comparative discourses of their authors. To achieve a high degree of understandability, the English authors of these texts drew frequently upon pre-existing medieval, classical and local accounts to construct a truly comparative ethnographic discourse. Primarily, this study is to serve as the first printed critical edition of the American Indian ethnographic material from Hakluyt's three-volume work. A critical introduction and commentary throughout these accounts will allow the modern reader to understand better the complexity and problems of description and intelligibility that affected these encounters. This paper examines the development of ethnographic sensitivity, textual sophistication and comparative discourses that illuminate sixteenth century English attitudes evident in the writings about North American Indians.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Modern.; American Studies.; History, Modern.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Comparitive Culutral and Literary Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Momaday, N. Scott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title'A mirror of Indian newes': North American Indian ethnographic writing in Richard Hakluyt's "Principall Navigations of the English Nation (1598-1600)''en_US
dc.creatorBerk, Ari David, 1967-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBerk, Ari David, 1967-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe publication of texts describing the first Anglo-Indian encounters in Richard Hakluyt's three volume work, Principall Navigations of the English Nation, published between 1598-1600, was driven by the desire to make complex and descriptive writings both comprehensible and usable to a sixteenth century audience. These texts, while they contain valuable ethnographic material, are nonetheless shaped and constrained by the comparative discourses of their authors. To achieve a high degree of understandability, the English authors of these texts drew frequently upon pre-existing medieval, classical and local accounts to construct a truly comparative ethnographic discourse. Primarily, this study is to serve as the first printed critical edition of the American Indian ethnographic material from Hakluyt's three-volume work. A critical introduction and commentary throughout these accounts will allow the modern reader to understand better the complexity and problems of description and intelligibility that affected these encounters. This paper examines the development of ethnographic sensitivity, textual sophistication and comparative discourses that illuminate sixteenth century English attitudes evident in the writings about North American Indians.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Modern.en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Modern.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComparitive Culutral and Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMomaday, N. Scotten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9832250en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38553752en_US
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