Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288839
Title:
"The Plague" in Albert Camus's fiction
Author:
Ast, Bernard Edward Jr., 1963-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation catalogues and examines Albert Camus's thematic repetitiveness as seen in his fiction and in how this repetitiveness relates to the world view presented in the so-called guillotine passage in his novel The Plague: that the world consists of scourges, victims, and an elusive third domain. A scourge can be an aggressor. It causes suffering and even death. The plague and other infirmities, both physical and mental, are aggressors. They are indiscriminate, merciless, and oftentimes deadly. Tyrants, too, are aggressors, some of which cling to the arbitrary, while others have a considerably more formal agenda. An aggressor can be metaphysical: the inner plague. Some aggressors, Like poverty and the climate, can also have a positive side to them. A scourge can also be an aggression--what the aggressor causes. They usually cannot be justified (existential separation, death, murder, execution, suicide), but some aggressions lead to enlightenment or positive change (exile, imprisonment, separation from loved ones). Yet one aggression, solitude of a certain kind, can actually be a desired and pleasant experience. Victims are the second domain. Camus focuses primarily on children, artists, clergy, judges and lawyers. The first three groups are presented in a balanced fashion, with emphasis on both the positive and the negative. Judges and lawyers are presented in a negative light, with only slight deviations. The third domain consists of true doctors (true friends) and peace/happiness, with true doctors--who are not necessarily doctors--contributing to the attainment of happiness or at least an improvement in circumstances. Light, the sea, other aspects of nature and sensual pleasures can also contribute to finding peace/happiness.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Literature, Romance.; Philosophy.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; French and Italian
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McGinnis, Reginald; Wittig, Monique

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title"The Plague" in Albert Camus's fictionen_US
dc.creatorAst, Bernard Edward Jr., 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAst, Bernard Edward Jr., 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation catalogues and examines Albert Camus's thematic repetitiveness as seen in his fiction and in how this repetitiveness relates to the world view presented in the so-called guillotine passage in his novel The Plague: that the world consists of scourges, victims, and an elusive third domain. A scourge can be an aggressor. It causes suffering and even death. The plague and other infirmities, both physical and mental, are aggressors. They are indiscriminate, merciless, and oftentimes deadly. Tyrants, too, are aggressors, some of which cling to the arbitrary, while others have a considerably more formal agenda. An aggressor can be metaphysical: the inner plague. Some aggressors, Like poverty and the climate, can also have a positive side to them. A scourge can also be an aggression--what the aggressor causes. They usually cannot be justified (existential separation, death, murder, execution, suicide), but some aggressions lead to enlightenment or positive change (exile, imprisonment, separation from loved ones). Yet one aggression, solitude of a certain kind, can actually be a desired and pleasant experience. Victims are the second domain. Camus focuses primarily on children, artists, clergy, judges and lawyers. The first three groups are presented in a balanced fashion, with emphasis on both the positive and the negative. Judges and lawyers are presented in a negative light, with only slight deviations. The third domain consists of true doctors (true friends) and peace/happiness, with true doctors--who are not necessarily doctors--contributing to the attainment of happiness or at least an improvement in circumstances. Light, the sea, other aspects of nature and sensual pleasures can also contribute to finding peace/happiness.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, Romance.en_US
dc.subjectPhilosophy.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFrench and Italianen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcGinnis, Reginalden_US
dc.contributor.advisorWittig, Moniqueen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831855en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38650137en_US
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