The Manduca Project for middle school: The development and pilot testing of a new science curriculum

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288836
Title:
The Manduca Project for middle school: The development and pilot testing of a new science curriculum
Author:
Nass, Jennifer Johanna, 1969-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation describes the development and pilot-testing of a new science curriculum called THE MANDUCA PROJECT for Middle School. The curriculum was developed in accordance with The National Science Education Standards through the cooperative efforts of a diverse group of people; three middle school science teachers, two undergraduate biochemistry majors, a multi-cultural curriculum specialist, and an entomologist with a minor in Teaching and Teacher Education. This group worked during a four week summer workshop, producing the framework for an inquiry-driven science curriculum built around investigations of Manduca sexta, or the tobacco hornworm. In the school year following the development of THE MANDUCA PROJECT for Middle School, the curriculum was pilot-tested in seven sixth grade classroom at two different middle schools. The study objectives were three-fold; first, to determine if the curriculum had any effect of students' science attitude, second, to determine if the curriculum had any effect on students' science process skills acquisition, and third to determine if the curriculum had any effect on students' science process skills acquisition. Results of the study indicated no measurable post-treatment effect on science attitude, a small post-treatment improvement in science concept acquisition, and dramatic post-treatment improvements in science concept acquisition.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Sciences.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Insect Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wells, Michael A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Manduca Project for middle school: The development and pilot testing of a new science curriculumen_US
dc.creatorNass, Jennifer Johanna, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorNass, Jennifer Johanna, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation describes the development and pilot-testing of a new science curriculum called THE MANDUCA PROJECT for Middle School. The curriculum was developed in accordance with The National Science Education Standards through the cooperative efforts of a diverse group of people; three middle school science teachers, two undergraduate biochemistry majors, a multi-cultural curriculum specialist, and an entomologist with a minor in Teaching and Teacher Education. This group worked during a four week summer workshop, producing the framework for an inquiry-driven science curriculum built around investigations of Manduca sexta, or the tobacco hornworm. In the school year following the development of THE MANDUCA PROJECT for Middle School, the curriculum was pilot-tested in seven sixth grade classroom at two different middle schools. The study objectives were three-fold; first, to determine if the curriculum had any effect of students' science attitude, second, to determine if the curriculum had any effect on students' science process skills acquisition, and third to determine if the curriculum had any effect on students' science process skills acquisition. Results of the study indicated no measurable post-treatment effect on science attitude, a small post-treatment improvement in science concept acquisition, and dramatic post-treatment improvements in science concept acquisition.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineInsect Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWells, Michael A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831844en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38646808en_US
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