An analysis of the Homol'ovi fauna with emphasis of ritual behavior

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288835
Title:
An analysis of the Homol'ovi fauna with emphasis of ritual behavior
Author:
Strand, Jennifer Gail, 1958-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An extensive analysis of the faunal material recovered from the four Homol'ovi pueblos yielded data on the past environment and changes in human and animal interactions. Life-history models incorporating ethnographic and ecological literature were developed and used to identify behaviors associated with the acquisition, processing, use, and disposal of animals in general, and specifically animals used in ritual context. The expectations created by these models were evaluated using a detailed, deposit driven, contextual analysis of each structure. Changes in ritual behaviors involving the fauna, ritual objects, and structures were identified; and included the introduction of new or expanded ritual abandonment processes at the two large, aggregated villages of Homol'ovi I and II. These changes in ritual behaviors suggest that ritual specialization occurred as a possible response to scalar stress during the plaza-oriented aggregation period (post A.D. 1330), and that ritual-based social power was enhanced by this specialization.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Anthropology, Cultural.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Adams, E. Charles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn analysis of the Homol'ovi fauna with emphasis of ritual behavioren_US
dc.creatorStrand, Jennifer Gail, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorStrand, Jennifer Gail, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn extensive analysis of the faunal material recovered from the four Homol'ovi pueblos yielded data on the past environment and changes in human and animal interactions. Life-history models incorporating ethnographic and ecological literature were developed and used to identify behaviors associated with the acquisition, processing, use, and disposal of animals in general, and specifically animals used in ritual context. The expectations created by these models were evaluated using a detailed, deposit driven, contextual analysis of each structure. Changes in ritual behaviors involving the fauna, ritual objects, and structures were identified; and included the introduction of new or expanded ritual abandonment processes at the two large, aggregated villages of Homol'ovi I and II. These changes in ritual behaviors suggest that ritual specialization occurred as a possible response to scalar stress during the plaza-oriented aggregation period (post A.D. 1330), and that ritual-based social power was enhanced by this specialization.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAdams, E. Charlesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831838en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38646742en_US
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