The Drosophila maternal-effect mutantcappuccino and its interactors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288825
Title:
The Drosophila maternal-effect mutantcappuccino and its interactors
Author:
Calley, John Nels, 1961-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
cappuccino (capu) is a Drosophila melanogaster gene required for establishing the dorsal-ventral and anterior-posterior axes of the developing egg and embryo. Egg chambers mutant for capu exhibit cytoplasmic streaming during mid-oogenesis that does not normally occur until late oogenesis. All known capu alleles stream at the same speed. Since capu alleles do differ in their effects on the dorsal-ventral axis, it is unlikely that premature streaming is a cause of the dorsal-ventral defects. Premature streaming may, however, cause the posterior defects. Streaming occurs at the same speed if isolated egg chambers are treated with the actin depolymerizing drug cytochalasin D, which suggests that CAPU may act in the actin cytoskeleton. A screen for proteins which physically interact with CAPU identified profilin, a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton as a probable partner of CAPU. This again suggests that CAPU acts in the actin cytoskeleton. CAPU is a member of the formin homology (FH) family of proteins. Sequence analysis of this family makes it possible to multiply align all family members throughout their carboxy-terminal halves. This makes possible better predictions of secondary structure, phylogenetic analysis, and identification of novel regions of conserved sequence. Analysis of the amino-terminal halves suggests that significant alignment is also possible in these more highly divergent regions. Members of the rho family of small GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. They physically associate with members of the FH family, including CAPU. All four rho-like proteins tested associate with CAPU in the Interaction Trap system. There are also indications of genetic interactions between capu and the rho-like genes dcdc42 and drac1.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Anatomy.; Biology, Molecular.; Biology, Animal Physiology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Manseau, Lynn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Drosophila maternal-effect mutantcappuccino and its interactorsen_US
dc.creatorCalley, John Nels, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCalley, John Nels, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractcappuccino (capu) is a Drosophila melanogaster gene required for establishing the dorsal-ventral and anterior-posterior axes of the developing egg and embryo. Egg chambers mutant for capu exhibit cytoplasmic streaming during mid-oogenesis that does not normally occur until late oogenesis. All known capu alleles stream at the same speed. Since capu alleles do differ in their effects on the dorsal-ventral axis, it is unlikely that premature streaming is a cause of the dorsal-ventral defects. Premature streaming may, however, cause the posterior defects. Streaming occurs at the same speed if isolated egg chambers are treated with the actin depolymerizing drug cytochalasin D, which suggests that CAPU may act in the actin cytoskeleton. A screen for proteins which physically interact with CAPU identified profilin, a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton as a probable partner of CAPU. This again suggests that CAPU acts in the actin cytoskeleton. CAPU is a member of the formin homology (FH) family of proteins. Sequence analysis of this family makes it possible to multiply align all family members throughout their carboxy-terminal halves. This makes possible better predictions of secondary structure, phylogenetic analysis, and identification of novel regions of conserved sequence. Analysis of the amino-terminal halves suggests that significant alignment is also possible in these more highly divergent regions. Members of the rho family of small GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. They physically associate with members of the FH family, including CAPU. All four rho-like proteins tested associate with CAPU in the Interaction Trap system. There are also indications of genetic interactions between capu and the rho-like genes dcdc42 and drac1.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Anatomy.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Molecular.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Animal Physiology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorManseau, Lynnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9831819en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38626044en_US
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