Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288796
Title:
Cancer screening among urban American Indian women
Author:
Risendal, Betsy Corsino, 1962-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Existing information about cancer among American Indians, although limited, suggests that incidence and mortality rates are increasing. Cancer is now the second leading cause of death among American Indian women. American Indians also have the poorest cancer survival of any group in the US. Improving the early detection of cancer is key to reducing mortality and improving survival. This study assessed screening rates and behaviors for breast and cervical cancer, two of the main causes of cancer death in American Indian women. The health beliefs and practices of urban American Indian women, a group which comprises half of this special population, were the focus of this cross-sectional random household survey. Our results are similar to the results of other studies which indicate that breast and cervical cancer screening rates in American Indian women are below both national estimates and goals set forth by the Public Health Service for the Year 2000. The prevalence of recent mammogram among urban southwestern American Indian women surveyed (35.7%) was less than half that of the US population, and only 49.5% indicated they had received a Pap smear in the last year in accordance with current guidelines for this high-risk population. Rate of physician referral for several cancer risk reduction programs also did not meet recommended levels. Improving health care access and knowledge and awareness of cancer screening are other potential ways of increasing screening participation, and more research is needed to promote the link between lifestyle habits and long-term health promotion in urban southwestern American Indian women.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Biostatistics.; Women's Studies.; Health Sciences, Public Health.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Philosophy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Giuliano, Anna

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCancer screening among urban American Indian womenen_US
dc.creatorRisendal, Betsy Corsino, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRisendal, Betsy Corsino, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractExisting information about cancer among American Indians, although limited, suggests that incidence and mortality rates are increasing. Cancer is now the second leading cause of death among American Indian women. American Indians also have the poorest cancer survival of any group in the US. Improving the early detection of cancer is key to reducing mortality and improving survival. This study assessed screening rates and behaviors for breast and cervical cancer, two of the main causes of cancer death in American Indian women. The health beliefs and practices of urban American Indian women, a group which comprises half of this special population, were the focus of this cross-sectional random household survey. Our results are similar to the results of other studies which indicate that breast and cervical cancer screening rates in American Indian women are below both national estimates and goals set forth by the Public Health Service for the Year 2000. The prevalence of recent mammogram among urban southwestern American Indian women surveyed (35.7%) was less than half that of the US population, and only 49.5% indicated they had received a Pap smear in the last year in accordance with current guidelines for this high-risk population. Rate of physician referral for several cancer risk reduction programs also did not meet recommended levels. Improving health care access and knowledge and awareness of cancer screening are other potential ways of increasing screening participation, and more research is needed to promote the link between lifestyle habits and long-term health promotion in urban southwestern American Indian women.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Biostatistics.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGiuliano, Annaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9829350en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38552723en_US
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