The influence of anxiety on students' academic performance during test-taking at Kuwait University

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288792
Title:
The influence of anxiety on students' academic performance during test-taking at Kuwait University
Author:
Al Gharibah, Awad M.D.F.
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between test anxiety (low, moderate, and high) and student performance on three dependent variables: GPA, midterm score, and final exam score. Four hundred forty-six full-time undergraduates from Kuwait University participated in this study during the spring semester of 1997. The Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI) scale was used to assess anxiety level in general and in both cognitive (worry) and emotional components, specifically. There were a number of major findings attributable to this study. The most important and unexpected finding was that there was no difference that can be accounted for by either cognitive (worry) or emotional components on the TAI for student test performance on the final exam. Other results show that overall, both female and male low anxious students rank higher in their GPA than moderate and high anxious students. However, low anxious female students' GPA ranks higher than low anxious male students' GPA. The findings also demonstrate that male sophomore students performed better on the final exam than all other students at all levels. In comparing the difference between the colleges, students in other colleges performed better than the College of Education students on the final exam. This may be due to unequal sample size for other colleges compared to the College of Education. Although not significant, another interesting pattern emerged when a covariate analysis was used to control for past performance as indicated by the GPA. When analyzing female and male students separately, the results indicate that higher anxious male and moderate anxious female students perform better than low and moderate anxious males and low and high anxious females in the final test exam. Without controlling for the GPA, there is no difference between test anxiety and midterm and final exam score. Finally, the results also show that the TAI scale is a reliable measure for assessing student anxiety level.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Tests and Measurements.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCaslin, Mary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe influence of anxiety on students' academic performance during test-taking at Kuwait Universityen_US
dc.creatorAl Gharibah, Awad M.D.F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAl Gharibah, Awad M.D.F.en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this study was to examine the relationship between test anxiety (low, moderate, and high) and student performance on three dependent variables: GPA, midterm score, and final exam score. Four hundred forty-six full-time undergraduates from Kuwait University participated in this study during the spring semester of 1997. The Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI) scale was used to assess anxiety level in general and in both cognitive (worry) and emotional components, specifically. There were a number of major findings attributable to this study. The most important and unexpected finding was that there was no difference that can be accounted for by either cognitive (worry) or emotional components on the TAI for student test performance on the final exam. Other results show that overall, both female and male low anxious students rank higher in their GPA than moderate and high anxious students. However, low anxious female students' GPA ranks higher than low anxious male students' GPA. The findings also demonstrate that male sophomore students performed better on the final exam than all other students at all levels. In comparing the difference between the colleges, students in other colleges performed better than the College of Education students on the final exam. This may be due to unequal sample size for other colleges compared to the College of Education. Although not significant, another interesting pattern emerged when a covariate analysis was used to control for past performance as indicated by the GPA. When analyzing female and male students separately, the results indicate that higher anxious male and moderate anxious female students perform better than low and moderate anxious males and low and high anxious females in the final test exam. Without controlling for the GPA, there is no difference between test anxiety and midterm and final exam score. Finally, the results also show that the TAI scale is a reliable measure for assessing student anxiety level.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Tests and Measurements.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCaslin, Maryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9829337en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b38552346en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.