Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288765
Title:
Macrophage response to polymeric vascular grafts
Author:
Salzmann, Dennis Lee, 1970-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of materials for replacement or repair of biological tissue and organs has been attempted for thousands of years. Regardless of material used or site of implantation all biomedical materials elicit a foreign body response by the host characterized by the presence of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with the polymer for the duration of the implant. This inflammatory response is believed to be responsible for the lack of biocompatibility of implanted materials. Furthermore, each type of biomedical device suffers from specific problems that may lead to the ultimate failure of the implant. Synthetic polymeric vascular grafts fail primarily due to the inherent thrombogenecity of the material and anastomotic neointimal thickening. In an attempt to create a non-thrombogenic lining on the blood contacting surface of vascular implants, the promotion of an endothelial lining on the luminal surface of vascular grafts has been investigated. This can be accomplished by both artificial and natural mechanisms. Regardless, it is believed that the inflammatory response elicited by the implant influences the angiogenic mechanisms and neointimal thickening associated with the implant. The relationship between inflammation and angiogenesis associated with biomedical implants remains to be delineated. Studies in this dissertation attempt to determine this relationship by examining the inflammatory response and inflammatory cytokines released by cells associated with polymeric implants and how these bioactive molecules influence the angiogenic response. Furthermore, an advancing technology in vascular repair, endovascular grafts, was tested in two vascular models to assess the general healing characteristics, inflammatory response and the formation of blood vessels associated with the device. The results from these studies suggest that the inflammatory response plays a fundamental role in the formation of blood vessels around polymeric implants and neointimal thickening on the luminal surface of vascular implants. From these experiments a greater understanding of the healing response associated with vascular grafts has resulted.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Animal Physiology.; Health Sciences, Immunology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Physiological Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, Stuart K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMacrophage response to polymeric vascular graftsen_US
dc.creatorSalzmann, Dennis Lee, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSalzmann, Dennis Lee, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of materials for replacement or repair of biological tissue and organs has been attempted for thousands of years. Regardless of material used or site of implantation all biomedical materials elicit a foreign body response by the host characterized by the presence of macrophages and foreign body giant cells with the polymer for the duration of the implant. This inflammatory response is believed to be responsible for the lack of biocompatibility of implanted materials. Furthermore, each type of biomedical device suffers from specific problems that may lead to the ultimate failure of the implant. Synthetic polymeric vascular grafts fail primarily due to the inherent thrombogenecity of the material and anastomotic neointimal thickening. In an attempt to create a non-thrombogenic lining on the blood contacting surface of vascular implants, the promotion of an endothelial lining on the luminal surface of vascular grafts has been investigated. This can be accomplished by both artificial and natural mechanisms. Regardless, it is believed that the inflammatory response elicited by the implant influences the angiogenic mechanisms and neointimal thickening associated with the implant. The relationship between inflammation and angiogenesis associated with biomedical implants remains to be delineated. Studies in this dissertation attempt to determine this relationship by examining the inflammatory response and inflammatory cytokines released by cells associated with polymeric implants and how these bioactive molecules influence the angiogenic response. Furthermore, an advancing technology in vascular repair, endovascular grafts, was tested in two vascular models to assess the general healing characteristics, inflammatory response and the formation of blood vessels associated with the device. The results from these studies suggest that the inflammatory response plays a fundamental role in the formation of blood vessels around polymeric implants and neointimal thickening on the luminal surface of vascular implants. From these experiments a greater understanding of the healing response associated with vascular grafts has resulted.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Animal Physiology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Immunology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiological Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Stuart K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814449en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37744859en_US
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