Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288759
Title:
The role of meaning in the sentence matching task
Author:
Veres, Csaba, 1964-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Semantic plausibility has been shown to affect a number of sentence processing tasks, including reading, sentence matching, and RSVP (Rapid Serial Visual Presentation). In this thesis it is argued that anomaly, and not plausibility is the critical variable. Unfortunately the distinction between anomaly and implausibility has not traditionally been a clear one, and definitions can vary depending on the semantic theory that is being adopted. The experiments reported in this thesis are aimed at finding a clearly definable distinction between anomalous and implausible sentences, and to show a reliable empirical consequence of the distinction. The major emphasis is placed on the sentence matching task, which has been claimed to be sensitive to a very specific level of syntactic processing, and to be unaffected by extraneous variables. Experiments 1 and 2, however, demonstrate the very clear effect of a semantic manipulation, on the sentence matching task. Experiments 3, 4, and 5 were designed to refine our understanding of the aspect of the manipulation that was critical. Finally in experiment 6, it is argued that the violation of basic conceptual categories which have been argued to organize lexical/conceptual structure, is the only circumstance under which the effect of meaning is seen in the sentence matching task, and possibly the reading task. Experiment 7 shows that the same conclusion is true for the RSVP task. These conclusions are considered in the light of Jackendoff's (1983) and Pustejovsy's (1990) theory of semantics. It is further argued that a close symbiotic relationship can exist between these formal theories, and the empirical findings.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Linguistics.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Forster, Kenneth I.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe role of meaning in the sentence matching tasken_US
dc.creatorVeres, Csaba, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorVeres, Csaba, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSemantic plausibility has been shown to affect a number of sentence processing tasks, including reading, sentence matching, and RSVP (Rapid Serial Visual Presentation). In this thesis it is argued that anomaly, and not plausibility is the critical variable. Unfortunately the distinction between anomaly and implausibility has not traditionally been a clear one, and definitions can vary depending on the semantic theory that is being adopted. The experiments reported in this thesis are aimed at finding a clearly definable distinction between anomalous and implausible sentences, and to show a reliable empirical consequence of the distinction. The major emphasis is placed on the sentence matching task, which has been claimed to be sensitive to a very specific level of syntactic processing, and to be unaffected by extraneous variables. Experiments 1 and 2, however, demonstrate the very clear effect of a semantic manipulation, on the sentence matching task. Experiments 3, 4, and 5 were designed to refine our understanding of the aspect of the manipulation that was critical. Finally in experiment 6, it is argued that the violation of basic conceptual categories which have been argued to organize lexical/conceptual structure, is the only circumstance under which the effect of meaning is seen in the sentence matching task, and possibly the reading task. Experiment 7 shows that the same conclusion is true for the RSVP task. These conclusions are considered in the light of Jackendoff's (1983) and Pustejovsy's (1990) theory of semantics. It is further argued that a close symbiotic relationship can exist between these formal theories, and the empirical findings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorForster, Kenneth I.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814420en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37743041en_US
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