The extended alto flute: The history and development of the alto flute, with a study of modern alto flute design and its effect on extended techniques in alto flute repertoire and pedagogical materials

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288758
Title:
The extended alto flute: The history and development of the alto flute, with a study of modern alto flute design and its effect on extended techniques in alto flute repertoire and pedagogical materials
Author:
Davis, John Edward, 1954-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this document is to trace the origin of the modern alto flute from its beginning through Theobald Boehm's design, compare the designs and acoustical qualities of modern alto and c-flutes; identify the various types of extended techniques found in contemporary alto and c-flute repertoire with attention as to how the realizion of these techniques may differ for alto and c-flute; and survey representative works for alto flute that incorporate extended techniques. Chapter I follows the development of larger flutes from examples found in Renaissance-period sources up to the early nineteenth century. Chapters II and III discuss Boehm's design innovations, identify specific parts of alto flute design that distinguish it from the c-flute, in in aspects such as air column diameter and volume, tone hole location and diameter, and head joint design. Chapters IV through VII investigate the origins of extended techniques on alto and c-flute and include explanation of various monophonic, microtonal and multiphonic techniques, and identify differences between alto and c-flute responses in these areas. Chapter VIII examines representative solo and chamber works for alto flute that incorporate extended techniques, with descriptions of the techniques and a grading system that rates these works on their level of extended technique difficulty. Three appendices are included: Appendix A is a quarter-tone fingering chart for the alto flute; Appendix B is a listing of alto flute multiphonic fingerings: Appendix C is a listing of descriptive notes for the multiphonics in Appendix B.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Music.; Education, Music.
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kashy, Jean-Louis

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe extended alto flute: The history and development of the alto flute, with a study of modern alto flute design and its effect on extended techniques in alto flute repertoire and pedagogical materialsen_US
dc.creatorDavis, John Edward, 1954-en_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, John Edward, 1954-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this document is to trace the origin of the modern alto flute from its beginning through Theobald Boehm's design, compare the designs and acoustical qualities of modern alto and c-flutes; identify the various types of extended techniques found in contemporary alto and c-flute repertoire with attention as to how the realizion of these techniques may differ for alto and c-flute; and survey representative works for alto flute that incorporate extended techniques. Chapter I follows the development of larger flutes from examples found in Renaissance-period sources up to the early nineteenth century. Chapters II and III discuss Boehm's design innovations, identify specific parts of alto flute design that distinguish it from the c-flute, in in aspects such as air column diameter and volume, tone hole location and diameter, and head joint design. Chapters IV through VII investigate the origins of extended techniques on alto and c-flute and include explanation of various monophonic, microtonal and multiphonic techniques, and identify differences between alto and c-flute responses in these areas. Chapter VIII examines representative solo and chamber works for alto flute that incorporate extended techniques, with descriptions of the techniques and a grading system that rates these works on their level of extended technique difficulty. Three appendices are included: Appendix A is a quarter-tone fingering chart for the alto flute; Appendix B is a listing of alto flute multiphonic fingerings: Appendix C is a listing of descriptive notes for the multiphonics in Appendix B.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKashy, Jean-Louisen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814411en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37742607en_US
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