The role of faunal resources in subsistence practices during the transition to sedentism and agriculture in southeastern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288739
Title:
The role of faunal resources in subsistence practices during the transition to sedentism and agriculture in southeastern Arizona
Author:
Wocherl, Helga
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
High ubiquities of maize, coupled with other evidence of extended occupations at large Early Agricultural period sites in the floodplain of the Middle Santa Cruz River, Tucson Basin, suggest an early commitment to cultivation, and raise questions about the settlement-subsistence system. Large, exceptionally well preserved faunal assemblages at these sites indicate that game made a significant dietary contribution during permanent or semi-permanent occupations with subsistence systems centered on cultivated and collected plants. To investigate diachronic changes in the selection and use of faunal resources during the transition to agricultural dependence and sedentism, estimates of available biomass, archaeofaunal assemblages, and their depositional contexts from several floodplain sites are compared. Accompanying the trends of increasing population, sedentism, and agricultural commitment, predicted changes include a decreasing frequency of artiodactyls, increasing intensity of processing of large game, an increase in the ratio of jackrabbits to cottontails, and evidence of increasing activities in communal space. Analyses of disposal contexts with primary, secondary, and de facto faunal refuse at six floodplain sites dating to the Cienega and Agua Caliente phases yielded evidence supporting these predictions. Intersite variability indicates site-specific solutions relating to settlement growth. Changes in the patterns of bone disposal in abandoned structures, short-lived intramural pits, and extramural processing features indicate that, over time, communal activities may have increased in response to faunal resource stress.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stiner, Mary C.; Fish, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe role of faunal resources in subsistence practices during the transition to sedentism and agriculture in southeastern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorWocherl, Helgaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWocherl, Helgaen_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHigh ubiquities of maize, coupled with other evidence of extended occupations at large Early Agricultural period sites in the floodplain of the Middle Santa Cruz River, Tucson Basin, suggest an early commitment to cultivation, and raise questions about the settlement-subsistence system. Large, exceptionally well preserved faunal assemblages at these sites indicate that game made a significant dietary contribution during permanent or semi-permanent occupations with subsistence systems centered on cultivated and collected plants. To investigate diachronic changes in the selection and use of faunal resources during the transition to agricultural dependence and sedentism, estimates of available biomass, archaeofaunal assemblages, and their depositional contexts from several floodplain sites are compared. Accompanying the trends of increasing population, sedentism, and agricultural commitment, predicted changes include a decreasing frequency of artiodactyls, increasing intensity of processing of large game, an increase in the ratio of jackrabbits to cottontails, and evidence of increasing activities in communal space. Analyses of disposal contexts with primary, secondary, and de facto faunal refuse at six floodplain sites dating to the Cienega and Agua Caliente phases yielded evidence supporting these predictions. Intersite variability indicates site-specific solutions relating to settlement growth. Changes in the patterns of bone disposal in abandoned structures, short-lived intramural pits, and extramural processing features indicate that, over time, communal activities may have increased in response to faunal resource stress.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStiner, Mary C.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorFish, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814355en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37745128en_US
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