The implication of information technology in telework: Adoption model and influencing factors of communication media choice among teleworkers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288732
Title:
The implication of information technology in telework: Adoption model and influencing factors of communication media choice among teleworkers
Author:
Shin, Bongsik, 1960-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
As the post-industrial environment requires more flexibility in organizational operations, telework is gradually gaining an acceptance as a distributed organizational design. Academic research, however, has not been effective in providing rich theoretical and empirical support for the planning and implementation of telework at organizations. This dissertation is motivated to contribute telework research through the investigation of implications that general-purpose communication media have on distributive telework. First, an empirical study is performed to understand the role of individual-, contextual-, and social-level factors on the media choice behaviors of remotely scattered teleworkers. Then, examination is made on how the media choice and other individual and social factors affect the perception on information-carrying capability and productivity of a communication medium, email. For this investigation, a hypothetical model that depicts the relationship among the constructs is proposed and relevant hypotheses are developed. Prior to the empirical study, existing literatures of telework are reviewed and characterized for the conceptual analysis of the problems and issues in telework. It was recognized that the narrow focus of research on teleworkers and the lack of a theoretical foundation are impeding broad understanding of telework. Data analysis indicates that teleworkers' media choice is the result of dynamics of individual-, contextual-, and social-level variables. Management support as a social influence showed the strongest impact on teleworkers' media use. The study confirms that, though regarded as a lean medium, email could become an effective and rich communication tool through an active social structuration process. Teleworkers belonging to an email-oriented communication network not only recognized email as a rich medium, but also had higher perception of work productivity from its use. The study confirms that, when email is recognized as an information-rich, as well as a function-rich, medium by teleworkers, a telework program could be benefited from the reduced loss of internal processes and enhanced work productivity.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Management.; Mass Communications.; Information Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Industrial Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sheng, Olivia L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe implication of information technology in telework: Adoption model and influencing factors of communication media choice among teleworkersen_US
dc.creatorShin, Bongsik, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorShin, Bongsik, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs the post-industrial environment requires more flexibility in organizational operations, telework is gradually gaining an acceptance as a distributed organizational design. Academic research, however, has not been effective in providing rich theoretical and empirical support for the planning and implementation of telework at organizations. This dissertation is motivated to contribute telework research through the investigation of implications that general-purpose communication media have on distributive telework. First, an empirical study is performed to understand the role of individual-, contextual-, and social-level factors on the media choice behaviors of remotely scattered teleworkers. Then, examination is made on how the media choice and other individual and social factors affect the perception on information-carrying capability and productivity of a communication medium, email. For this investigation, a hypothetical model that depicts the relationship among the constructs is proposed and relevant hypotheses are developed. Prior to the empirical study, existing literatures of telework are reviewed and characterized for the conceptual analysis of the problems and issues in telework. It was recognized that the narrow focus of research on teleworkers and the lack of a theoretical foundation are impeding broad understanding of telework. Data analysis indicates that teleworkers' media choice is the result of dynamics of individual-, contextual-, and social-level variables. Management support as a social influence showed the strongest impact on teleworkers' media use. The study confirms that, though regarded as a lean medium, email could become an effective and rich communication tool through an active social structuration process. Teleworkers belonging to an email-oriented communication network not only recognized email as a rich medium, but also had higher perception of work productivity from its use. The study confirms that, when email is recognized as an information-rich, as well as a function-rich, medium by teleworkers, a telework program could be benefited from the reduced loss of internal processes and enhanced work productivity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
dc.subjectInformation Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSheng, Olivia L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806839en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3755718xen_US
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