Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288716
Title:
Curriculum negotiation in an inquiry-based classroom
Author:
Crawford, Kathleen Marie, 1959-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This teacher research takes place in an inquiry based, intermediate, multiage classroom in Tucson, Arizona. The purpose of this research is to explore how students and teacher determine a new class focus through the use of a broad concept to make decisions about curriculum. In particular, this research examines the process of negotiation the teacher and students create to make connections from a previous class focus in order to discover a new focus of study. As a qualitative study, this teacher research employs the data collection techniques such as the use of field notes, reflective journals (both teacher and students), transcripts from discussions from negotiation meetings, student interviews on teacher role, and analysis of children's written artifacts. Triangulation of the data allowed for an in-depth analysis resulting in thick description of the planning conferences for a new class focus. This study focuses on the role and process the teacher takes within the negotiation period. There is an examination of how the teacher looks at (1) the organizational structures, (2) focus lessons, (3) structures for reflection, (4) facilitation, and (5) kidwatching. This study also focuses on the roles and processes of the students within the planning conference when determining a class focus. There is a look at how the students (1) make decisions, (2) listen and organize, (3) assume different roles in discussions, and (4) work toward an understanding among each other. The findings of the study points toward the need for democratic classrooms. Students need to be in a learning context where decisions are made by the members in the classroom. Education in a democratic community moves beyond the individual growth of a member. Social interaction between community members is essential to the growth of members in a learning community where people are expected to live and work together. In this study students had opportunity to voice their opinions and the freedom to create their own curriculum through meaningful contexts.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Elementary.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCurriculum negotiation in an inquiry-based classroomen_US
dc.creatorCrawford, Kathleen Marie, 1959-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Kathleen Marie, 1959-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis teacher research takes place in an inquiry based, intermediate, multiage classroom in Tucson, Arizona. The purpose of this research is to explore how students and teacher determine a new class focus through the use of a broad concept to make decisions about curriculum. In particular, this research examines the process of negotiation the teacher and students create to make connections from a previous class focus in order to discover a new focus of study. As a qualitative study, this teacher research employs the data collection techniques such as the use of field notes, reflective journals (both teacher and students), transcripts from discussions from negotiation meetings, student interviews on teacher role, and analysis of children's written artifacts. Triangulation of the data allowed for an in-depth analysis resulting in thick description of the planning conferences for a new class focus. This study focuses on the role and process the teacher takes within the negotiation period. There is an examination of how the teacher looks at (1) the organizational structures, (2) focus lessons, (3) structures for reflection, (4) facilitation, and (5) kidwatching. This study also focuses on the roles and processes of the students within the planning conference when determining a class focus. There is a look at how the students (1) make decisions, (2) listen and organize, (3) assume different roles in discussions, and (4) work toward an understanding among each other. The findings of the study points toward the need for democratic classrooms. Students need to be in a learning context where decisions are made by the members in the classroom. Education in a democratic community moves beyond the individual growth of a member. Social interaction between community members is essential to the growth of members in a learning community where people are expected to live and work together. In this study students had opportunity to voice their opinions and the freedom to create their own curriculum through meaningful contexts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806790en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37538032en_US
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