The effect of classroom use of an electronic group support system on student critical thinking, performance and satisfaction

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/288701
Title:
The effect of classroom use of an electronic group support system on student critical thinking, performance and satisfaction
Author:
Ayoub, Judith Lorene, 1941-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of an Interactive Computer Classroom (ICC) as compared to a traditional lecture format (LEC) for a nursing management course taught during the fall semester 1996 was examined in this study. The ICC was structured around Group Systems Support software, a tool previously used in business settings for group decision-making activities. The outcomes included critical thinking, measured by written responses completed at the end of each class and by scores from the California Critical Thinking Skills Test; academic performance, measured by the management course's midterm grades; and student satisfaction, measured by attendance and course evaluations. To consider generalizability of performance, the midterm examination scores of a concurrent nursing course were also measured. The management course midterm scores of the ICC group were significantly higher than those of the LEC group. The response to the open-ended-questions of the student evaluations indicated strong support of the participation made available by the computer activities but frustration with the computer hardware and software. Further evidence supporting student satisfaction was that six students requested to be transferred to the ICC group when the study was completed at mid-semester, while no students chose to move to the LEC group. There were no significant differences in scores for the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, the midterms grades for a concurrent nursing course, and class attendance.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Education.; Health Sciences, Nursing.; Education, Technology of.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Slaughter, Sheila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effect of classroom use of an electronic group support system on student critical thinking, performance and satisfactionen_US
dc.creatorAyoub, Judith Lorene, 1941-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAyoub, Judith Lorene, 1941-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of an Interactive Computer Classroom (ICC) as compared to a traditional lecture format (LEC) for a nursing management course taught during the fall semester 1996 was examined in this study. The ICC was structured around Group Systems Support software, a tool previously used in business settings for group decision-making activities. The outcomes included critical thinking, measured by written responses completed at the end of each class and by scores from the California Critical Thinking Skills Test; academic performance, measured by the management course's midterm grades; and student satisfaction, measured by attendance and course evaluations. To consider generalizability of performance, the midterm examination scores of a concurrent nursing course were also measured. The management course midterm scores of the ICC group were significantly higher than those of the LEC group. The response to the open-ended-questions of the student evaluations indicated strong support of the participation made available by the computer activities but frustration with the computer hardware and software. Further evidence supporting student satisfaction was that six students requested to be transferred to the ICC group when the study was completed at mid-semester, while no students chose to move to the LEC group. There were no significant differences in scores for the California Critical Thinking Skills Test, the midterms grades for a concurrent nursing course, and class attendance.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Education.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806760en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3751586xen_US
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