Investigations into new approaches for analyzing pharmaceuticals through the use of array detector imaging of high-performance TLC and well plates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/285013
Title:
Investigations into new approaches for analyzing pharmaceuticals through the use of array detector imaging of high-performance TLC and well plates
Author:
Simon, Richard Edward
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
New methods of analyzing pharmaceuticals by high performance thin-layer chromatography and microplate imaging were investigated using array imaging technology. Both techniques provide high sample throughput over more traditional analytical techniques for the analysis of pharmaceuticals. HPTLC provides high sample throughput by performing separations in parallel using a planar stationary phase. Imaging the entire plate with a single exposure performs quantitation of the analytes in the chromatographic medium. Fluorescence and fluorescence quenching detection modes are presented by employing tetracyclines, famotidine, and several over the counter drugs as model compounds. Studies conducted include sensitivity, separation efficiency and reproducibility of the system. Microplate imaging allows for the quantitation of numerous analytes in parallel. In this technique, solutions containing the analyte of interest are deposited into numerous self-contained wells on microplates, also known as 96-wellplates or ELISA plates. Light is passed through the wells of the plate allowing for absorption, fluorescence, or fluorescence quenching. Imaging with an array detector enables the researcher to simultaneously quantitate each well in parallel. The reaction between primary amines, ampicillin and amoxicillin, and fluorescamine was investigated. Microplate imaging was also tested for quantitating analytes in the low UV region (254 nm).
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chemistry, Analytical.; Chemistry, Pharmaceutical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Denton, M. Bonner

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInvestigations into new approaches for analyzing pharmaceuticals through the use of array detector imaging of high-performance TLC and well platesen_US
dc.creatorSimon, Richard Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Richard Edwarden_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNew methods of analyzing pharmaceuticals by high performance thin-layer chromatography and microplate imaging were investigated using array imaging technology. Both techniques provide high sample throughput over more traditional analytical techniques for the analysis of pharmaceuticals. HPTLC provides high sample throughput by performing separations in parallel using a planar stationary phase. Imaging the entire plate with a single exposure performs quantitation of the analytes in the chromatographic medium. Fluorescence and fluorescence quenching detection modes are presented by employing tetracyclines, famotidine, and several over the counter drugs as model compounds. Studies conducted include sensitivity, separation efficiency and reproducibility of the system. Microplate imaging allows for the quantitation of numerous analytes in parallel. In this technique, solutions containing the analyte of interest are deposited into numerous self-contained wells on microplates, also known as 96-wellplates or ELISA plates. Light is passed through the wells of the plate allowing for absorption, fluorescence, or fluorescence quenching. Imaging with an array detector enables the researcher to simultaneously quantitate each well in parallel. The reaction between primary amines, ampicillin and amoxicillin, and fluorescamine was investigated. Microplate imaging was also tested for quantitating analytes in the low UV region (254 nm).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Analytical.en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Pharmaceutical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDenton, M. Bonneren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9946830en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39916935en_US
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