Intimacy, marital adjustment, and well-being in long-term survivors of childhood cancer

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284891
Title:
Intimacy, marital adjustment, and well-being in long-term survivors of childhood cancer
Author:
Gallagher, Sandra Marie, 1964-
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study examined well-being and the contribution of intimacy and marital satisfaction to well-being in long-term survivors of childhood cancer (LTSCC). In addition, self-esteem, warmth and gregariousness were included to test for mediating effects. 207 adult LTSCC were assessed using the Rand Well-Being measure, Miller's Social Intimacy Scale, the Dyadic Adjustment Survey, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the NEO-PI Warmth and Gregariousness subscales, and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (M-C) each of these is a well established and well validated self-report measure. Survivors scores on each of these measures were contrasted with those of a control group of adults who did not have a cancer history (N = 169). Each of the variables, as well as several sociodemographic and medical variables, were utilized in regression and path analyses to determine their ability to predict well-being. LTSCC reported significantly less overall well-being (F = 78.9, p &lt; .000), significantly more anxiety (F = 194.2, p < .000) and depression (F = 1262.3, p < .000), and significantly less positive well-being (F = 18.6, p < .000), health (F = 137.0, p < .000), and self-control (F = 88.3, p < .000) than controls. Survivors reported significantly more intimacy (F = 5.1, p < .01), marital adjustment (F = 5.3, p < .01), self-esteem (F = 216.8, p < .001), warmth (F = 65.2, p < .001) and gregariousness (F = 113.3, p < .001) than controls. LTSCC also had higher scores on the M-C (F = 26.7, p < .001). An omnibus stepwise multiple regression analysis accounting for 27% of the variance, revealed that self-esteem and the interaction of warmth and intimacy were the best predictors of well-being. Group membership was a nonsignificant predictor of well-being. Finally, path analysis was employed and different models "fit" the LTSCC and the controls. The best path model (NET = .94) for the LTSCC indicates that well-being predicts intimacy. The best path model (NET = .98) for the controls, on the other hand, indicates that intimacy predicts well-being. These results are discussed in terms of developmental and social support theories. Interpretations of these results, strengths and weaknesses of the study, and implications for theory, application, and future research are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Psychology, Clinical.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.; Health Sciences, Oncology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schwartz, Gary E. R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIntimacy, marital adjustment, and well-being in long-term survivors of childhood canceren_US
dc.creatorGallagher, Sandra Marie, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Sandra Marie, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined well-being and the contribution of intimacy and marital satisfaction to well-being in long-term survivors of childhood cancer (LTSCC). In addition, self-esteem, warmth and gregariousness were included to test for mediating effects. 207 adult LTSCC were assessed using the Rand Well-Being measure, Miller's Social Intimacy Scale, the Dyadic Adjustment Survey, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the NEO-PI Warmth and Gregariousness subscales, and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (M-C) each of these is a well established and well validated self-report measure. Survivors scores on each of these measures were contrasted with those of a control group of adults who did not have a cancer history (N = 169). Each of the variables, as well as several sociodemographic and medical variables, were utilized in regression and path analyses to determine their ability to predict well-being. LTSCC reported significantly less overall well-being (F = 78.9, p &lt; .000), significantly more anxiety (F = 194.2, p < .000) and depression (F = 1262.3, p < .000), and significantly less positive well-being (F = 18.6, p < .000), health (F = 137.0, p < .000), and self-control (F = 88.3, p < .000) than controls. Survivors reported significantly more intimacy (F = 5.1, p < .01), marital adjustment (F = 5.3, p < .01), self-esteem (F = 216.8, p < .001), warmth (F = 65.2, p < .001) and gregariousness (F = 113.3, p < .001) than controls. LTSCC also had higher scores on the M-C (F = 26.7, p < .001). An omnibus stepwise multiple regression analysis accounting for 27% of the variance, revealed that self-esteem and the interaction of warmth and intimacy were the best predictors of well-being. Group membership was a nonsignificant predictor of well-being. Finally, path analysis was employed and different models "fit" the LTSCC and the controls. The best path model (NET = .94) for the LTSCC indicates that well-being predicts intimacy. The best path model (NET = .98) for the controls, on the other hand, indicates that intimacy predicts well-being. These results are discussed in terms of developmental and social support theories. Interpretations of these results, strengths and weaknesses of the study, and implications for theory, application, and future research are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Oncology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchwartz, Gary E. R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9946805en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39914392en_US
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