Mechanisms of word learning in children: Insights from fast mapping

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284747
Title:
Mechanisms of word learning in children: Insights from fast mapping
Author:
Markson, Lori Robin
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Children can learn aspects of the meaning of a new word on the basis of only a few incidental exposures and can retain this knowledge for a long time. The process of rapidly learning and remembering new words has come to be known as fast mapping. It is often maintained that fast mapping is the result of a dedicated language mechanism, but it is possible that this same capacity might apply in domains other than language learning. The present studies explore the nature of fast mapping, with the goal of revealing more about the mechanism underlying word learning in children. One possibility is that the capacity for word learning is mediated by a specialized language mechanism. A second view posits that all of language acquisition depends on more general cognitive processes. Alternatively, the acquisition of words and grammar may involve different mechanisms. To test these alternative proposals, children and adults were taught a new object name and an arbitrary fact about a novel object, and were tested for their retention immediately or after a delay. The findings revealed that fast mapping is not limited to word learning, suggesting that the capacity to learn and retain new words is the result of learning and memory abilities that are not specific to language. Three further studies then explored the specificity and development of the capacity for fast mapping. The implications of these findings for theories of word learning are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bloom, Paul

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMechanisms of word learning in children: Insights from fast mappingen_US
dc.creatorMarkson, Lori Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarkson, Lori Robinen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractChildren can learn aspects of the meaning of a new word on the basis of only a few incidental exposures and can retain this knowledge for a long time. The process of rapidly learning and remembering new words has come to be known as fast mapping. It is often maintained that fast mapping is the result of a dedicated language mechanism, but it is possible that this same capacity might apply in domains other than language learning. The present studies explore the nature of fast mapping, with the goal of revealing more about the mechanism underlying word learning in children. One possibility is that the capacity for word learning is mediated by a specialized language mechanism. A second view posits that all of language acquisition depends on more general cognitive processes. Alternatively, the acquisition of words and grammar may involve different mechanisms. To test these alternative proposals, children and adults were taught a new object name and an arbitrary fact about a novel object, and were tested for their retention immediately or after a delay. The findings revealed that fast mapping is not limited to word learning, suggesting that the capacity to learn and retain new words is the result of learning and memory abilities that are not specific to language. Three further studies then explored the specificity and development of the capacity for fast mapping. The implications of these findings for theories of word learning are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBloom, Paulen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9946787en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39904611en_US
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