Between revolution, power, and liberty: Continuity and change in family, gender, and society in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1776-1870

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284714
Title:
Between revolution, power, and liberty: Continuity and change in family, gender, and society in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1776-1870
Author:
Shumway, Jeffrey Merrill
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines the impact of independence on society in Buenos Aires, Argentina, by looking at family relations and the state in the late colonial and early-national periods. The state and the family frequently interacted in courts where parents, children, and spouses converged to settle civil disputes. This project focuses on marriage conflict cases (disensos), child custody cases, divorce cases, as well as newspapers and literature of the times to study societal attitudes regarding patriarchal power, free will, romantic love, socio-racial differences, and the role of women. Strong legal and societal traditions perpetuated continuities in porteno family life and society from the late colonial into the national period. Underneath those continuities, however, important changes emerged. Revolutionary wars, liberal ideology, and the necessities of building a new nation created ruptures that weakened (though by no means destroyed) patriarchal authority. Children had more freedom to marry the mate of their choice, despite social and racial differences. Attitudes towards women also changed and they had more space to maneuver in society after independence. Porteno families, and society in general, were moving closer to what is considered "modern." The revolutionary era was not just a symbolic and rhetorical movement. Rather, it ushered in important processes of change that shaped the future of the Argentine nation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.; Women's Studies.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Guy, Donna J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBetween revolution, power, and liberty: Continuity and change in family, gender, and society in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1776-1870en_US
dc.creatorShumway, Jeffrey Merrillen_US
dc.contributor.authorShumway, Jeffrey Merrillen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the impact of independence on society in Buenos Aires, Argentina, by looking at family relations and the state in the late colonial and early-national periods. The state and the family frequently interacted in courts where parents, children, and spouses converged to settle civil disputes. This project focuses on marriage conflict cases (disensos), child custody cases, divorce cases, as well as newspapers and literature of the times to study societal attitudes regarding patriarchal power, free will, romantic love, socio-racial differences, and the role of women. Strong legal and societal traditions perpetuated continuities in porteno family life and society from the late colonial into the national period. Underneath those continuities, however, important changes emerged. Revolutionary wars, liberal ideology, and the necessities of building a new nation created ruptures that weakened (though by no means destroyed) patriarchal authority. Children had more freedom to marry the mate of their choice, despite social and racial differences. Attitudes towards women also changed and they had more space to maneuver in society after independence. Porteno families, and society in general, were moving closer to what is considered "modern." The revolutionary era was not just a symbolic and rhetorical movement. Rather, it ushered in important processes of change that shaped the future of the Argentine nation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGuy, Donna J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9946779en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39888393en_US
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