Provocatively and evocatively vivid language: An extension of Language Expectancy Theory

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284504
Title:
Provocatively and evocatively vivid language: An extension of Language Expectancy Theory
Author:
Melcher, Charlene
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of vividness have been argued to be weak, elusive, and illusory. This study reconceptualized vividness as a language characteristic along four dimensions: emotional interest, concreteness, proximity, and image valence, and attempted to extend Language Expectancy Theory as the explanatory mechanism for vividness. Based on LET, it was proposed that an interaction effect between source characteristics (sex and credibility) and message characteristics (vividness) would occur. No support for the hypothesized interaction effects were found although the extension of Language Expectancy Theory to vividness is, ultimately, supported. Based on this study's finding that vivid messages were only slightly persuasive (creating more positive message evaluation and message agreement than did pallid messages), it is concluded that vivid language is not a promising message strategy for the health context. Refinements of Language Expectancy Theory in terms of expectancy strength and source credibility are suggested, and directions for future research advanced.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Speech Communication.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burgoon, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleProvocatively and evocatively vivid language: An extension of Language Expectancy Theoryen_US
dc.creatorMelcher, Charleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMelcher, Charleneen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of vividness have been argued to be weak, elusive, and illusory. This study reconceptualized vividness as a language characteristic along four dimensions: emotional interest, concreteness, proximity, and image valence, and attempted to extend Language Expectancy Theory as the explanatory mechanism for vividness. Based on LET, it was proposed that an interaction effect between source characteristics (sex and credibility) and message characteristics (vividness) would occur. No support for the hypothesized interaction effects were found although the extension of Language Expectancy Theory to vividness is, ultimately, supported. Based on this study's finding that vivid messages were only slightly persuasive (creating more positive message evaluation and message agreement than did pallid messages), it is concluded that vivid language is not a promising message strategy for the health context. Refinements of Language Expectancy Theory in terms of expectancy strength and source credibility are suggested, and directions for future research advanced.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurgoon, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9934847en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39651903en_US
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