Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284493
Title:
Body composition and quality of life changes in HIV infection
Author:
Earthman, Carrie Penland
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
As the efficacy of clinical management of HIV infection continues to improve, there is a growing need for outcomes research to focus on finding ways to improve physical well-being and quality of life. Weight loss and body cell mass (BCM) depletion are two clinical issues that have received ongoing attention from researchers, given that both are potent predictors of morbidity in HIV-infected individuals. In this series of studies, three primary issues were addressed. First, the relationship between pharmacological (oxandrolone) and nutritional therapies and changes in BCM and body weight was examined over a 4-mo descriptive clinical trial. Second, the impact of these changes was considered in terms of quality of life change. Third, these analyses provided an opportunity to compare single-frequency bioelectrical impedance with multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance methods for measuring BCM change. There were a number of compelling findings in this research. First, HIV-infected individuals receiving oxandrolone and nutritional intervention were observed to gain both body weight and BCM. Significant relationships were observed between weight gain and improved quality of life, physical well-being, and appetite. In addition to these results, the use of bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) was demonstrated to have several advantages over the more commonly used single-frequency bioelectrical impedance method for measuring BCM in the field, including the ability to provide valid measures of BCM in HIV infection. Based on these findings, it appears that early identification by a valid field method, BIS, and a multi-faceted therapeutic approach may be most effective in the treatment of weight loss and BCM depletion in HIV-infected individuals.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nutrition.; Health Sciences, Public Health.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Howell, Wanda H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBody composition and quality of life changes in HIV infectionen_US
dc.creatorEarthman, Carrie Penlanden_US
dc.contributor.authorEarthman, Carrie Penlanden_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs the efficacy of clinical management of HIV infection continues to improve, there is a growing need for outcomes research to focus on finding ways to improve physical well-being and quality of life. Weight loss and body cell mass (BCM) depletion are two clinical issues that have received ongoing attention from researchers, given that both are potent predictors of morbidity in HIV-infected individuals. In this series of studies, three primary issues were addressed. First, the relationship between pharmacological (oxandrolone) and nutritional therapies and changes in BCM and body weight was examined over a 4-mo descriptive clinical trial. Second, the impact of these changes was considered in terms of quality of life change. Third, these analyses provided an opportunity to compare single-frequency bioelectrical impedance with multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance methods for measuring BCM change. There were a number of compelling findings in this research. First, HIV-infected individuals receiving oxandrolone and nutritional intervention were observed to gain both body weight and BCM. Significant relationships were observed between weight gain and improved quality of life, physical well-being, and appetite. In addition to these results, the use of bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) was demonstrated to have several advantages over the more commonly used single-frequency bioelectrical impedance method for measuring BCM in the field, including the ability to provide valid measures of BCM in HIV infection. Based on these findings, it appears that early identification by a valid field method, BIS, and a multi-faceted therapeutic approach may be most effective in the treatment of weight loss and BCM depletion in HIV-infected individuals.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHowell, Wanda H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9934845en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39651654en_US
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