Testing the boundaries: Dating violence and the General Theory of Crime

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284383
Title:
Testing the boundaries: Dating violence and the General Theory of Crime
Author:
Chapple, Constance Lee
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation, "Testing the Boundaries: Intimate Violence and the General Theory of Crime" is a test of the General Theory of Crime regarding intimate violence. The investigation is three pronged. I test the applicability of the General Theory to explain the causal structure of intimate violence, intimate offending risks and risks of intimate victimization. Additionally, the meaning for both learning theory and control theory in criminology concerning the link between witnessing parental violence and later delinquent acts is discussed. This current work fills two gaps in the field of contemporary criminology. First, few studies of intimate violence have been undertaken from a criminological, control perspective. Second, this investigation attempts to extend the General Theory to predict victimization risks. The results of the analyses clearly support the applicability of applying the General Theory of Crime to explain dating violence and general crime.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Sociology, General.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gottfredson, Michael R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTesting the boundaries: Dating violence and the General Theory of Crimeen_US
dc.creatorChapple, Constance Leeen_US
dc.contributor.authorChapple, Constance Leeen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation, "Testing the Boundaries: Intimate Violence and the General Theory of Crime" is a test of the General Theory of Crime regarding intimate violence. The investigation is three pronged. I test the applicability of the General Theory to explain the causal structure of intimate violence, intimate offending risks and risks of intimate victimization. Additionally, the meaning for both learning theory and control theory in criminology concerning the link between witnessing parental violence and later delinquent acts is discussed. This current work fills two gaps in the field of contemporary criminology. First, few studies of intimate violence have been undertaken from a criminological, control perspective. Second, this investigation attempts to extend the General Theory to predict victimization risks. The results of the analyses clearly support the applicability of applying the General Theory of Crime to explain dating violence and general crime.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, General.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGottfredson, Michael R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927518en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39570435en_US
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