Communication abilities and work reentry following traumatic brain injury

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284327
Title:
Communication abilities and work reentry following traumatic brain injury
Author:
Isaki, Emi
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine if a single communication measure or combination of measures could discriminate employed from unemployed individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Twenty adult subjects (ten employed and ten unemployed), one to four years post injury, with comparable severity of injury and type of work participated in the study. Each subject was given ten communication tests measuring: auditory processing (Filtered Words, Auditory Figure Ground, Competing Words, and Competing Sentences subtests of the SCAN-A); the effects of speaking under time pressure (FAS and Rapid Automatized Naming); production of oral language (local coherence); language ability (Aphasia Quotient portion of the Western Aphasia Battery); and functional verbal reasoning ability (Scheduling and Planning an Event subtests of the Functional Assessment of Verbal Reasoning (FAVR)). Results revealed that when a combination of three communication tests, the Scheduling subtest of the FAVR, and the Filtered Words and Competing Sentences subtests of the SCAN-A, was used, the model correctly classified 85% of employed and unemployed individuals. The findings suggest that both impairment and disability-based tasks (i.e. those measuring activities that reflect daily communication) may be more revealing than the impairment-level tasks alone that frequently appear in the TBI and work re-entry literature. Impairment and disability level communication tasks may provide functional and practical information, which can be used to assist in work re-entry.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Speech Pathology.; Sociology, Industrial and Labor Relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Speech and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Turkstra, Lyn; Holland, Audrey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCommunication abilities and work reentry following traumatic brain injuryen_US
dc.creatorIsaki, Emien_US
dc.contributor.authorIsaki, Emien_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this exploratory study was to determine if a single communication measure or combination of measures could discriminate employed from unemployed individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Twenty adult subjects (ten employed and ten unemployed), one to four years post injury, with comparable severity of injury and type of work participated in the study. Each subject was given ten communication tests measuring: auditory processing (Filtered Words, Auditory Figure Ground, Competing Words, and Competing Sentences subtests of the SCAN-A); the effects of speaking under time pressure (FAS and Rapid Automatized Naming); production of oral language (local coherence); language ability (Aphasia Quotient portion of the Western Aphasia Battery); and functional verbal reasoning ability (Scheduling and Planning an Event subtests of the Functional Assessment of Verbal Reasoning (FAVR)). Results revealed that when a combination of three communication tests, the Scheduling subtest of the FAVR, and the Filtered Words and Competing Sentences subtests of the SCAN-A, was used, the model correctly classified 85% of employed and unemployed individuals. The findings suggest that both impairment and disability-based tasks (i.e. those measuring activities that reflect daily communication) may be more revealing than the impairment-level tasks alone that frequently appear in the TBI and work re-entry literature. Impairment and disability level communication tasks may provide functional and practical information, which can be used to assist in work re-entry.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Speech Pathology.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Industrial and Labor Relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech and Hearing Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTurkstra, Lynen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHolland, Audreyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9927511en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39569901en_US
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