Regime types and development performance: An empirical study of the effect of military controlled regimes on economic development

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284297
Title:
Regime types and development performance: An empirical study of the effect of military controlled regimes on economic development
Author:
Alsudairy, Waleed Bin Nayef
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The basic idea of this study is to examine the effect of the degree of military control on economic development. It adopts a broad definition of military control (that considers direct and total military rule, as well as indirect and partial levels of military control), and focuses on the influence over the long run. The study articulates eleven interrelated hypotheses in the subject, and tests them utilizing two complementary methodological strategies: A cross-national analysis that applies OLS multiple regression technique on a sample of 138 countries for the period from 1961 to 1990; and a comparative case study of the four North African countries (of Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia). The findings clearly support the main argument of the study that military control inherent certain characteristics that impedes economic growth (i.e., GDP per capita) over the long run . The negative influence of military control on domestic investment, protection of property rights, and (to a lesser extent) domestic conflict constitute major observable mechanisms for its adverse effect on economic growth. Also, the cross-national findings suggest that military control has no significant influence on social development. However, in some individual cases, like in Algeria and Libya, military control promoted initial social development but failed in building viable political institutions. The evidence of the study suggests that future political inquiry in the subject should do the following: Reconsider the effect of the degree of military control on economic growth, improve the military control measure, and focus on its influence on the financial and economic aspects.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Economics, General.; Political Science, General.; Political Science, International Law and Relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dixon, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRegime types and development performance: An empirical study of the effect of military controlled regimes on economic developmenten_US
dc.creatorAlsudairy, Waleed Bin Nayefen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlsudairy, Waleed Bin Nayefen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe basic idea of this study is to examine the effect of the degree of military control on economic development. It adopts a broad definition of military control (that considers direct and total military rule, as well as indirect and partial levels of military control), and focuses on the influence over the long run. The study articulates eleven interrelated hypotheses in the subject, and tests them utilizing two complementary methodological strategies: A cross-national analysis that applies OLS multiple regression technique on a sample of 138 countries for the period from 1961 to 1990; and a comparative case study of the four North African countries (of Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia). The findings clearly support the main argument of the study that military control inherent certain characteristics that impedes economic growth (i.e., GDP per capita) over the long run . The negative influence of military control on domestic investment, protection of property rights, and (to a lesser extent) domestic conflict constitute major observable mechanisms for its adverse effect on economic growth. Also, the cross-national findings suggest that military control has no significant influence on social development. However, in some individual cases, like in Algeria and Libya, military control promoted initial social development but failed in building viable political institutions. The evidence of the study suggests that future political inquiry in the subject should do the following: Reconsider the effect of the degree of military control on economic growth, improve the military control measure, and focus on its influence on the financial and economic aspects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, General.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDixon, William J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992132en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41175153en_US
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