Short-term memory and learning in children with fetal alcohol syndrome/effects

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284282
Title:
Short-term memory and learning in children with fetal alcohol syndrome/effects
Author:
Paquette Hammond, Andrea
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Short-term memory function and learning in children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Effects (FAS/E) was examined. Participants included twenty school-aged children diagnosed with either Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effects (mean age = 11.13 years) and twenty normal controls (mean age = 11.11 years) matched on age and gender, all of which were Native American and lived on a rural reservation. All participants completed nine core subtests of the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning. Results indicated that children with FAS/E performed significantly more poorly than controls on eight of the nine memory measures, including Number/Letter Memory, Sentence Memory, Story Memory, Finger Windows, Design Memory, Verbal Learning, Visual Learning, and Sound-Symbol. No statistically significant group differences were found on Picture Memory. Subsequent discriminant function analyses revealed that scores on the WRAML subtest provided useful discriminating information for children with FAS/E and controls. Scores on Story Memory, Design Memory, and Number/Letter Memory most strongly discriminated between groups. Implications of these results are discussed and recommendations for further research are provided.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Public Health.; Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sabers, Darrell

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleShort-term memory and learning in children with fetal alcohol syndrome/effectsen_US
dc.creatorPaquette Hammond, Andreaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaquette Hammond, Andreaen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractShort-term memory function and learning in children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Effects (FAS/E) was examined. Participants included twenty school-aged children diagnosed with either Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or Fetal Alcohol Effects (mean age = 11.13 years) and twenty normal controls (mean age = 11.11 years) matched on age and gender, all of which were Native American and lived on a rural reservation. All participants completed nine core subtests of the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning. Results indicated that children with FAS/E performed significantly more poorly than controls on eight of the nine memory measures, including Number/Letter Memory, Sentence Memory, Story Memory, Finger Windows, Design Memory, Verbal Learning, Visual Learning, and Sound-Symbol. No statistically significant group differences were found on Picture Memory. Subsequent discriminant function analyses revealed that scores on the WRAML subtest provided useful discriminating information for children with FAS/E and controls. Scores on Story Memory, Design Memory, and Number/Letter Memory most strongly discriminated between groups. Implications of these results are discussed and recommendations for further research are provided.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSabers, Darrellen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992111en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41170581en_US
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