Relationships between perceptions of conducting effectiveness and ensemble performance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284256
Title:
Relationships between perceptions of conducting effectiveness and ensemble performance
Author:
VanWeelden, Kimberly Dianne
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Conducting is a complex art which involves, among other things, effective nonverbal communication. And, while this communication includes hand and arm gestures as well as eye contact and facial expression, it also encompasses nonverbal messages sent by the rest of a conductor's body such as their physical appearance. Perceptions drawn by what a person looks like and how well they fit the stereotypical role they are portraying oftentimes affects opinions of their job performance. Thus, the nonverbal messages sent by a conductor's physical appearance could affect ensemble member's opinions of them as a conductor. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between conductor body type and perceptions of conductor effectiveness and ensemble performance. Further, relationships between the conductor's visual appearance characteristics, which included eye contact, facial expression, and posture, and performance ratings, evaluator confidence in the conductor and performance ratings, and overall conductor effectiveness and performance ratings were explored. It was found that body type of the conductor as well as gender and college major of the evaluator did not effect the ratings of conductor and ensemble performances. However, performance ratings were affected when conductors were viewed in a certain order. There were moderate to moderately strong relationships between the performance ratings and conductor posture, conductor facial expression, evaluator's confidence in the conductor, overall conducting effectiveness. Eye contact, however, did not seem to impact the performance ratings to a great degree.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Music.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dunn, Dwayne E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRelationships between perceptions of conducting effectiveness and ensemble performanceen_US
dc.creatorVanWeelden, Kimberly Dianneen_US
dc.contributor.authorVanWeelden, Kimberly Dianneen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractConducting is a complex art which involves, among other things, effective nonverbal communication. And, while this communication includes hand and arm gestures as well as eye contact and facial expression, it also encompasses nonverbal messages sent by the rest of a conductor's body such as their physical appearance. Perceptions drawn by what a person looks like and how well they fit the stereotypical role they are portraying oftentimes affects opinions of their job performance. Thus, the nonverbal messages sent by a conductor's physical appearance could affect ensemble member's opinions of them as a conductor. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between conductor body type and perceptions of conductor effectiveness and ensemble performance. Further, relationships between the conductor's visual appearance characteristics, which included eye contact, facial expression, and posture, and performance ratings, evaluator confidence in the conductor and performance ratings, and overall conductor effectiveness and performance ratings were explored. It was found that body type of the conductor as well as gender and college major of the evaluator did not effect the ratings of conductor and ensemble performances. However, performance ratings were affected when conductors were viewed in a certain order. There were moderate to moderately strong relationships between the performance ratings and conductor posture, conductor facial expression, evaluator's confidence in the conductor, overall conducting effectiveness. Eye contact, however, did not seem to impact the performance ratings to a great degree.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDunn, Dwayne E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992068en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41166292en_US
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