Gender tipping: The effects of a changing student gender composition on new faculty salaries

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/284253
Title:
Gender tipping: The effects of a changing student gender composition on new faculty salaries
Author:
Winsten-Bartlett, Cheryl Sue
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research questions two fundamental assumptions of established educational policies designed to promote gender equity. First, that the external labor market is the principal predictor of disciplinary salaries when all other factors are controlled, and second, that integration of women into these marketable disciplines will result in pay equity. This study describes the national trends in female participation and gender redistribution in academic disciplines, evaluates student gender composition as a proxy for "feminization" of academic fields, and examines the value of comparable worth and labor market variables in tandem to predict faculty salary increases by discipline. Correlation, chi-square and logit analyses were performed to determine the direction of gender redistribution among disciplines over time, and to address the relationship between the level of disciplinary gender composition change and the level of disciplinary salary change. The annual percentage change (logged) in full-time assistant professor salary by discipline and institution was regressed on the proportion of female students within disciplines, the distribution of male students among disciplines, NRC rank, and prior year salary (logged). Gender redistribution among disciplines is not arbitrary and changes in gender composition can predict the level of disciplinary salary increases. The full regression model was significant. The variables for female participation tended to have a significant negative influence, while the variables for male participation tended to have a significant positive influence on changes in faculty salary.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Finance.; Women's Studies.; Economics, Labor.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Slaughter, Sheila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGender tipping: The effects of a changing student gender composition on new faculty salariesen_US
dc.creatorWinsten-Bartlett, Cheryl Sueen_US
dc.contributor.authorWinsten-Bartlett, Cheryl Sueen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research questions two fundamental assumptions of established educational policies designed to promote gender equity. First, that the external labor market is the principal predictor of disciplinary salaries when all other factors are controlled, and second, that integration of women into these marketable disciplines will result in pay equity. This study describes the national trends in female participation and gender redistribution in academic disciplines, evaluates student gender composition as a proxy for "feminization" of academic fields, and examines the value of comparable worth and labor market variables in tandem to predict faculty salary increases by discipline. Correlation, chi-square and logit analyses were performed to determine the direction of gender redistribution among disciplines over time, and to address the relationship between the level of disciplinary gender composition change and the level of disciplinary salary change. The annual percentage change (logged) in full-time assistant professor salary by discipline and institution was regressed on the proportion of female students within disciplines, the distribution of male students among disciplines, NRC rank, and prior year salary (logged). Gender redistribution among disciplines is not arbitrary and changes in gender composition can predict the level of disciplinary salary increases. The full regression model was significant. The variables for female participation tended to have a significant negative influence, while the variables for male participation tended to have a significant positive influence on changes in faculty salary.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Finance.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Labor.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSlaughter, Sheilaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992062en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41166206en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.